Poor maintenance practices plague Lorain’s Elmwood Cemetery – Lorain, Ohio

Below is the related Lorain “MorningJournal” News Story;

“Lorain cemetery grounds-keeping raises concerns”

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These photographs below were taken on August 12, 2018 at Elmwood Cemetery in Lorain.  They illustrate maintenance practices that are causing clumps of thick dead grass to stick to the stones and dry in the hot sun; making it difficult to remove the clumps from the stone.  

I think most folks would consider this an unsightly mess and disrespectful to the deceased.  This situation means that family members must clean off the dried up clumps from their family’s markers and monuments.  What about the markers and monuments where there is no family to handle this situation?  Will the cemetery groundskeepers come back to remove the thick clumps from the surface?  We just don’t know at this point.  

Sadly, this is the worst Elmwood Cemetery has looked since I have been visiting it for over 20 years.  

 

 

 

 

This last photo above illustrates where part of the problem lies.

Taking too long between trimmings.  

Allowing gravemarkers

to become too overgrown means taking too aggressive

of an approach to remove the grass/weeds around them. 

As we can easily see here; it has been awhile since there has been any trimming around this flat marker.  

Thankfully, there is no dead grass/weeds covering it; but live grass/weeds are covering over and around it to the point eventually it may no longer be seen. 

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Cemetery vandalism continues at Ohio cemeteries both large and small

From the “Herald-Dispatch” in Huntington, West Virginia, published on July 3rd by Luke Creasy are details from the latest update about the current state of the damage at the The Rome-Proctorville Cemetery in Proctorville, Lawrence County, Ohio.

Sharing these excerpts from this story because I feel they are insightful, and are definitely good to know and understand if one of your ancestor’s stones was damaged — not knocked over and no other type of damage.

We learn from the details that the degree and type of damage to a grave marker can dictate if those responsible for the cemetery accepts responsibility to properly repair it.

Also, please note that it is crucial to be sure who is responsible for a cemetery. The example as stated here demonstrates that if there is an older cemetery adjacent to a newer cemetery there might be a different owner for the older one. Thus, if both cemeteries suffer damage it cannot automatically be assumed that the same entity (i.e. township, church, village, etc.) owns both cemeteries and will handle remediation of damages at both cemeteries.:

“Rome-Proctorville Cemetery caretaker Ron Jenkins said he wants to get the headstones in the upright position as quickly as possible and is working with Lawson Monument Company in Huntington to get the headstones off the ground and resealed. Jenkins estimated the cost at $150 per headstone.Lawson began repairs at the cemetery on Monday morning. Fourteen stones were picked up, placed and sealed on Monday. Jenkins said Lawson has been very accommodating, and remaining repairs will be made by the end of the week.

“(Lawson) said some of them have permanent damage on them, but we’re not going to be responsible in replacing those. We’re just trying to get them all set back up and sealed back down.”

Permanent damage to a gravestone includes any surface damage to the stone such as cracks, scratches and chips. Jenkins said that families that have been affected by permanent damage will not be forced to replace headstones but do have the option of purchasing new stones.

In response to the crime, Bowen said the cemetery will institute increased security steps moving forward. High-definition surveillance cameras soon will be added, as well as additional measures that Bowen did not want to disclose at the time. He said the cemetery’s goal is to prevent this situation from happening in the future.

According to Jenkins, there were additional headstones overturned in the Old Rome Cemetery that neighbors Rome-Proctorville; however, they are not responsible for upkeep on those grounds.”

Some News Stories about recent cemetery vandalism in Ohio.:

 From The “Toledo Blade”: Thursday, June 28, 2018

Forest Cemetery in Toledo:

 “Headstones Again Vandalized at Forest Cemetery”

Contact Sarah Elms at selms@theblade.com419-724-6103, or on Twitter @BySarahElms.

“More than 100 headstones have been toppled at Forest Cemetery this month, and many of the vandalized grave-markers date back to the 1800s.

The most recent act of vandalism — about 12 headstones knocked over — was discovered Wednesday, Cemeteries Foreman Luke Smigielski said. The city runs five cemeteries, and only Forest Cemetery has experienced the vandalism this summer, he said.

More than 50 headstones were discovered knocked over on June 11, and another 42 were found toppled June 18. Forest Cemetery spans 94 acres and is home to more than 94,000 headstones, many of which weigh hundreds to thousands of pounds.”

Forest Cemetery in Toledo on “Find A Grave”The “Grave Tracker” – Forest Cemetery City of Toledo

From the “Dayton Daily News” – Monday, July 2, 2018 – Miamisburg, Montgomery County, Ohio:

“Highland Cemetery gravestone damaged over weekend”

Craig Weaver’s memorial on “Find A Grave”

Photo of Craig Weaver’s grave marker prior to its destruction

Sharing from Heritage Avon Lake (Lorain County) – Monday, May 14th, 2018 – At 1:00p.m. Mary Milne: Epitaphs and Icons: Interpreting Gravestones

 

 

“Memorializing the dead with grave markers, headstones and tombstones, family burial plots were marked with rough stones, rocks or wood as a way to keep the dead from rising.  The deceased’s name, age and year of death were inscribed.  From 1650-1900 square shaped tombstones from slate and sandstone evolved with churchyard burials.  During the Victorian era (1837-1901) lavish and decorated gravestones included sculptured designs, artwork and symbols.  Marble, granite, iron and wood were popular materials from 1780 to the present. 

 

Mary Milne, professional genealogist, presents Epitaphs and Icons: Interpreting Gravestones on Monday, May 14, 2018 at the Avon Lake Public Library’s Waugaman Gallery.  She has investigated cemetery records, carvings, and statues that provide clues to aid genealogy research.  Learn how to interpret often-overlooked messages on gravestones. 

 

All events, which are free, will be held from 1 to 2 p.m. in the Waugaman Gallery at Avon Lake Public Library, 32649 Electric Blvd.

 

Heritage Avon Lake is a local history organization that collects, preserves, and promotes oral, written, and physical history. For more information, visit www.heritageavonlake.org or call 440.549.4425.”

 

Mark Your Calendar for Sunday, April 22, 2018 – Beginning at 9:00AM – Restoration Project Session at the Old Burying Ground in Greenfield, Highland County, Ohio

 Sharing from the Greenfield Historical Society.:

***Sunday, April 22, 2018***

Beginning at 9:00a.m.

“Since 2014, the Old Burying Ground (OBG) in Greenfield, Ohio, has been undergoing work by a group of dedicated volunteers. Throughout each year, work sessions have been held by project leaders Scott and Venus Andersen and John King.

Contact John King at the Greenfield Historical Society if you plan to attend.”

John King’s email address: jfking@earthlink.net

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Old Burial Ground next to Travellers Rest 

“Please join other volunteers as we continue to make improvements to the Old Burial Ground. 

We’ll start at 9:00 a.m. and work as long as we have the energy. 

Come help and stay as long as you can.

Join us for an upcoming work session. You can stay as long as you like. 

We will help you get started if you have not participated previously. 

Tasks range from cleaning stones, straightening stones, recording information, etc. 

We post our scheduled sessions on the Greenfield Historical Society website calendar.” 

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(Select photographs below 
from the 2014 Old Burying Ground Project

by Linda Jean Limes Ellis)

 

Link to the document for:

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The Old Burying Ground in Greenfield

on “Find A Grave”.

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Map

Ohio Statehood Day is Wednesday, February 28, 2018 – 9a.m. to 1:30p.m. at the Ohio Statehouse! The Ohio History Connection has All of the Details! Advance Registration is Required – Deadline is February 20, 2018 to Register

Source: Ohio Statehood Day is Wednesday, February 28, 2018 – 9a.m. to 1:30p.m. at the Ohio Statehouse! The Ohio History Connection has All of the Details! Advance Registration is Required – Deadline is February 20, 2018 to Register

Only on NBC5: Good Samaritan gives Sterlingville Cemetery some TLC

Jacksonville, Ore. — There’s a spot just outside of Jacksonville, that holds a special place in one Rogue Valley man’s heart. Tonight, he’s working tirelessly to leave it better than he found it, for the sake of his father and those around him too. ‘He was my soul… #allen #cemetery #dennis

Source: Only on NBC5: Good Samaritan gives Sterlingville Cemetery some TLC