Spotlighting the Temperance Movement in Ohio — Before there was Hillsboro; there was Greenfield.

Sharing this great article recently published from the “Pike County News Watchman” by Sherry M. Stanley in her “Rural Rendezvous” Column entitled: 

I eagerly read through the timeline history of the Temperance Movement in Ohio since I had an early collateral line ancestor who was involved in it; however, she took part in the Greenfield Liquor Raid of 1865 that has been largely forgotten about due to being overshadowed by Hillsboro’s crusade as stated in many accounts and in this article:

“At Hillsboro, Ohio, in 1873, a group of women led by Eliza J. Thompson, founder of the Women’s Temperance Crusade, marched in the streets, stopping at saloons to pray for patrons and saloon keepers, and demanding that saloon keepers sign a pledge to stop selling alcoholic beverages. The march in Hillsboro prompted additional marches in more than 130 communities.”

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Sharing my “Find A Grave” memorial for my collateral line Limes ancestor – Eliza Catherine “Kate” Marchant Gaskill.  I included as much information that I could compile about the July 10, 1865 Greenfield Liquor Raid and the subsequent 1867 trial those determined ladies of Greenfield faced because of their actions.  

These crusading women were ‘warriors’ for eradicating the evils of liquor in their village.  They had strong beliefs that were based on the tragedies that resulted in so much misery stemming from drunkenness; and they wanted to do something to stop it.  I can’t blame them.  For them it had to be akin to the opiate crisis we are experiencing today – overwhelming.  They didn’t want to sit on the sidelines and do nothing.  

 

Prohibition was later repealed as we know, but these ladies will be remembered as women who took a stand boldly for a cause they believed in and were proud of it throughout their whole lives.

 

ELIZA CATHERINE LIMES MARCHANT GASKILL STORY

Cincinnati Daily Gazette

Thursday, January 24, 1867 – Page 1:1 – Volume 78

“FEMALE SUASION WITH THE LIQUOR DEALERS.

The Greenfield Ladies on Trial.

Their Know Nothing Meeting – Female Efforts to Keep a Secret – Testimony of the Ladies”

 Correspondence of the Cincinnati Gazette.

 Hillsboro, O. January 22.

“Did you see any hatchets there?”

“I did see two. Miss Julia Lake had one, and Miss Limes one.  I asked what they were for.  The ladies about me did not know.  I asked Miss Limes.  She said that the ladies who invited her to come, asked her to bring a hatchet; she supposed the liquor was to be spilled, after it was given up.  I remarked ironically, yes.  I suppose after it is rolled out it will be spilled.  I joined the procession as everybody else did; there was no change in dress, didn’t see any ladies wearing pages to their dresses. “

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Spotlighting the Ridgelawn Cemetery in Elyria, Ohio.

The photographs below are from my October 17, 2017 visit to Ridgelawn Cemetery in Elyria, Ohio

 It was my first visit, and one that was much overdue.  These are just a small sampling of the historic gravestones and monuments to be found at this early Ohio cemetery.  

The earliest burial that I found belongs to Nathaniel Porter who died in June (13th?) 1822.

  His “Find A Grave” memorial contains an extensive biographical write-up.  He was re-interred from another cemetery, however.  Links to memorials for his spouse and children are included with his memorial.  

A visitor can spend several splendid hours exploring Ridgelawn Cemetery in Elyria and easily become immersed in its landscape of amazing variety of trees among towering military monuments. One is topped with a soaring Eagle while another has a life-size Civil War soldier painted in appropriate Union Regimental colors. 

The 1820s – 1840s delicately carved grave markers there are indeed remarkable in their simplicity and not to be missed before you leave.  Several impressive mausoleums include those that are reminiscent of small sandstone houses! 

A visitor cannot help but be drawn to the grand wrought iron gated family plot of Heman Ely and his descendants.  


Ridgelawn Cemetery is a sacred place  where pioneer history awaits visitors who are fortunate enough to come and walk its grounds.

 

If you lived in Northeast Ohio from the 1960’s until the present you will remember these familar faces!

Sharing this link from Cleveland.com’s Entertainment Files spotlighting memorial Cleveland TV broadcasters and program hosts.  

I browsed through the latest link of “46 more memorable TV personalities from Cleveland’s past” and the previous initial one posted in March that was included as a link in the story’s first paragraph.

I recall watching almost all of these folks during their time as broadcasters and personalities on the different Cleveland TV stations.  

Looking at their faces and reading their life stories brought back a flood of memories about how I remembered them, and also my own life and its events during those years of each of their careers.  

Some may be missing from these two stories (I can think of one, Gary Short, who worked on Ch. 43 WUAB who had a more extensive career in radio), but there can’t be too many that were somehow left out.  Some got a ‘nod’ to their careers while others have more extensive write-ups about their broadcasting days before, during, and after their time in Cleveland.  Sadly, some are now deceased.   

So, if you lived in Cleveland, or anywhere in Northeast Ohio, and watched Channels 3, 5, 8, or the UHF channel 43, you are in for a real treat!  

Unwind as you re-wind your thoughts back to an earlier time in your life when your only TV choices were 3 or 4 channels, beginning with the black and white days of television and moving into the mid-60s and the advent of color TV.

We watched them on black and white floor model TVs, portable TV’s, table top TVs, swivel base TVs, Stereo and radio/ color TV combination models, TVs with remotes, and later flat screen display “TVs”, but no matter how we watched them, they were who we watched. They were the people whom we trusted to bring us our latest news and who entertained us day after day.  

It is quite amazing to learn how many broadcasters either started their careers in Cleveland or advanced them while in Cleveland before moving on to larger television markets.  

Their smiling faces and recognizable voices were part of our daily routines. They appeared in our living rooms or other rooms of the house as time went on. We would set aside the evening newspaper, or stop whatever we were doing,  to watch them and hear what they had to say about the events of the day.

We gathered with families and friends to watch these familiar faces without truly realizing it was a shared time together because we didn’t live any other way.  

There was no Internet, no computers, no cell phones or tablets.  Watching the local news took on an important role in our lives as a place to learn the latest happenings in our neighborhoods and beyond.  

We can remember it as a time of trust in news reporting from journalists and broadcasters.  The words “Fake News” were not even remotely in our thoughts about these professionals.  

What time has taken away as it moved us into the 21st Century.  It meant we had to leave those years and our relationships with those TV folks behind.  Now they are memorable people as we contemplate our time with them during those special golden years. 

 

The fun of Researching Ohio Bricks

I recently purchased three Ohio bricks (meaning that the word “Ohio” is stamped on them!) that I thought were really neat to have.  I knew I had some other older red bricks with different names stamped on them so I wanted to add the Ohio bricks to the small but now growing collection.

Sharing my photos of the bricks here. I cleaned them up with “D/2 Biological Solution”, a soft bristle brush, and regular water to rinse them off.  It will take awhile longer for them to lighten up more than they are now.  

Also sharing some great links that I found on the Internet about bricks made in Ohio:

Brick Names

“The Paving Brick Industry in Ohio” from the Ohiodnr 

The Trimble and Wassall Brick Companies, Athens County, Ohio

Bricks of Ohio WordPress blog:

     Metropolitan Block Canton, Ohio

     Trimble Block

“Historic Ohio Bricks” publication order form

“Brickcollectorblog”BRICKS - VALENTINE XX 1W

BRICKS - BIG FOUR BRICK