Sharing Susan Hoffman Matthews’ website with photograph collections

Sharing Susan Hoffman Matthews genealogical website

Under the tab “Photographs Collections” – Susan has so kindly shared her photographs she took on Saturday, September 21, 2019 in Upper Sandusky, Wyandot County, Ohio, when the deed was transferred from the United Methodists to the Wyandotte Nation Oklahoma for the Methodist Mission Church and the Old Mission Cemetery.  

FROM SUSAN HOFFMAN MATTHEWS - SEPTEMBER 21 2019 - UPPER SANDUSKY OHIO DEED TRANSFER.jpg

Sharing side-by-side before repairs and after repairs photos of the Henry Wilson Irwin Family markers at the Old Burying Ground in Greenfield, Ohio courtesy of Scott Andersen

It is my pleasure to share these side-by-side photographs taken by Scott Andersen on August 22, 2019 of the row of Henry Wilson Irwin family grave markers at the Old Burying Ground in Greenfield, Highland County, Ohio.  

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Another step in this process remains to be completed for these grave markers.  That is cleaning them with D/2 Biological Solution.

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All of this restoration progress for these nine grave markers was made possible through the efforts of Greenfield Historical Society volunteers, Scott Andersen, John King, and Michael Lee Anderson who largely handle the repairs and re-settings of grave markers; as well as the heavy lifting for the larger monuments at the Old Burying Ground. 

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One of Greenfield’s most notable native sons and decorated Naval hero was Rear Admiral Noble Edward Irwin.  

His parents were Henry Wilson Irwin and his fourth wife, Lavinia Ann “Lavina” Rogers Irwin.  

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Rear Admiral Irwin graduated from the United States Naval Academy in June 1891. He was wounded in action on May 1, 1898 while aboard the USS Baltimore at the Battle of Manila Bay. Admiral Irwin was awarded the Navy Cross for meritorious service as director of Naval Aviation during WWI.
The U.S. Destroyer, the USS Irwin, was named in his honor.”

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Old Burying Ground,Greenfield, Highland County, Ohio – May 15, 2018 – Starting at 9:00A.M. – Until? – The Next Hands-On Cemetery Preservation Project Session Conducted by The Greenfield Historical Society

Reminder:  The Next Volunteer Hands-On Cemetery Preservation Work Session at Greenfield’s earliest cemetery, The Old Burying Ground, will be coming up on Tuesday, May 15th, 2018 beginning at 9:00a.m.  — it is a “stay as long as you can environment”.

The Old Burying Ground’s restoration/preservation efforts are now in their 5th year…and still going strong!!  

 

Many of the historical society’s volunteers, namely, John King, Scott and Venus Andersen, Harold Schmidt, and Gloria Losey, have been volunteering since the beginning.  Others have also joined them over the past years, including, Michael  Lee Anderson and Jackie Doles, who are regulars as well.  

 

You won’t find a more dedicated, and experienced group of caring individuals who are working to restore an early Ohio cemetery than these volunteers!   

 Also, be sure to check out the link below with details and photographs taken at the previous work session on May 8th.:

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“Volunteer Session – May 8, 2018”

“What a beautiful day for work in the cemetery! We were able to realign more stones, repair a couple broken stones, clean some stones, and using the hoist, lift and reset a few of the heavier stones. Joining in were Scott Andersen, John King, Jackie Doles, Mike Anderson, Gloria Losey and her sister Karen, Harold Schmidt, and Avery Applegate (who came from Hillsboro to help).”

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****How Can YOU Help?****

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“Join us for an upcoming work session. You can stay as long as you like. We will help you get started if you have not participated previously. Tasks range from cleaning stones, straightening stones, recording information, etc. We post our scheduled sessions on the GHS website calendar

 For further details, or to sign up to participate in the next volunteer work session, contact John King, of the Greenfield History Society at:  
 jfking@earthlink.net.

The Old Burying Ground on “Find A Grave”

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The Old Burying Ground’s Ohio Historic Inventory # HIG-00314-02 with the Ohio History Connection’s Preservation Office.

Spotlighting the Temperance Movement in Ohio — Before there was Hillsboro; there was Greenfield.

Sharing this great article recently published from the “Pike County News Watchman” by Sherry M. Stanley in her “Rural Rendezvous” Column entitled: 

I eagerly read through the timeline history of the Temperance Movement in Ohio since I had an early collateral line ancestor who was involved in it; however, she took part in the Greenfield Liquor Raid of 1865 that has been largely forgotten about due to being overshadowed by Hillsboro’s crusade as stated in many accounts and in this article:

“At Hillsboro, Ohio, in 1873, a group of women led by Eliza J. Thompson, founder of the Women’s Temperance Crusade, marched in the streets, stopping at saloons to pray for patrons and saloon keepers, and demanding that saloon keepers sign a pledge to stop selling alcoholic beverages. The march in Hillsboro prompted additional marches in more than 130 communities.”

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Sharing my “Find A Grave” memorial for my collateral line Limes ancestor – Eliza Catherine “Kate” Marchant Gaskill.  I included as much information that I could compile about the July 10, 1865 Greenfield Liquor Raid and the subsequent 1867 trial those determined ladies of Greenfield faced because of their actions.  

These crusading women were ‘warriors’ for eradicating the evils of liquor in their village.  They had strong beliefs that were based on the tragedies that resulted in so much misery stemming from drunkenness; and they wanted to do something to stop it.  I can’t blame them.  For them it had to be akin to the opiate crisis we are experiencing today – overwhelming.  They didn’t want to sit on the sidelines and do nothing.  

 

Prohibition was later repealed as we know, but these ladies will be remembered as women who took a stand boldly for a cause they believed in and were proud of it throughout their whole lives.

 

ELIZA CATHERINE LIMES MARCHANT GASKILL STORY

Cincinnati Daily Gazette

Thursday, January 24, 1867 – Page 1:1 – Volume 78

“FEMALE SUASION WITH THE LIQUOR DEALERS.

The Greenfield Ladies on Trial.

Their Know Nothing Meeting – Female Efforts to Keep a Secret – Testimony of the Ladies”

 Correspondence of the Cincinnati Gazette.

 Hillsboro, O. January 22.

“Did you see any hatchets there?”

“I did see two. Miss Julia Lake had one, and Miss Limes one.  I asked what they were for.  The ladies about me did not know.  I asked Miss Limes.  She said that the ladies who invited her to come, asked her to bring a hatchet; she supposed the liquor was to be spilled, after it was given up.  I remarked ironically, yes.  I suppose after it is rolled out it will be spilled.  I joined the procession as everybody else did; there was no change in dress, didn’t see any ladies wearing pages to their dresses. “

Spotlighting the Ridgelawn Cemetery in Elyria, Ohio.

The photographs below are from my October 17, 2017 visit to Ridgelawn Cemetery in Elyria, Ohio

 It was my first visit, and one that was much overdue.  These are just a small sampling of the historic gravestones and monuments to be found at this early Ohio cemetery.  

The earliest burial that I found belongs to Nathaniel Porter who died in June (13th?) 1822.

  His “Find A Grave” memorial contains an extensive biographical write-up.  He was re-interred from another cemetery, however.  Links to memorials for his spouse and children are included with his memorial.  

A visitor can spend several splendid hours exploring Ridgelawn Cemetery in Elyria and easily become immersed in its landscape of amazing variety of trees among towering military monuments. One is topped with a soaring Eagle while another has a life-size Civil War soldier painted in appropriate Union Regimental colors. 

The 1820s – 1840s delicately carved grave markers there are indeed remarkable in their simplicity and not to be missed before you leave.  Several impressive mausoleums include those that are reminiscent of small sandstone houses! 

A visitor cannot help but be drawn to the grand wrought iron gated family plot of Heman Ely and his descendants.  


Ridgelawn Cemetery is a sacred place  where pioneer history awaits visitors who are fortunate enough to come and walk its grounds.

 

If you lived in Northeast Ohio from the 1960’s until the present you will remember these familar faces!

Sharing this link from Cleveland.com’s Entertainment Files spotlighting memorial Cleveland TV broadcasters and program hosts.  

I browsed through the latest link of “46 more memorable TV personalities from Cleveland’s past” and the previous initial one posted in March that was included as a link in the story’s first paragraph.

I recall watching almost all of these folks during their time as broadcasters and personalities on the different Cleveland TV stations.  

Looking at their faces and reading their life stories brought back a flood of memories about how I remembered them, and also my own life and its events during those years of each of their careers.  

Some may be missing from these two stories (I can think of one, Gary Short, who worked on Ch. 43 WUAB who had a more extensive career in radio), but there can’t be too many that were somehow left out.  Some got a ‘nod’ to their careers while others have more extensive write-ups about their broadcasting days before, during, and after their time in Cleveland.  Sadly, some are now deceased.   

So, if you lived in Cleveland, or anywhere in Northeast Ohio, and watched Channels 3, 5, 8, or the UHF channel 43, you are in for a real treat!  

Unwind as you re-wind your thoughts back to an earlier time in your life when your only TV choices were 3 or 4 channels, beginning with the black and white days of television and moving into the mid-60s and the advent of color TV.

We watched them on black and white floor model TVs, portable TV’s, table top TVs, swivel base TVs, Stereo and radio/ color TV combination models, TVs with remotes, and later flat screen display “TVs”, but no matter how we watched them, they were who we watched. They were the people whom we trusted to bring us our latest news and who entertained us day after day.  

It is quite amazing to learn how many broadcasters either started their careers in Cleveland or advanced them while in Cleveland before moving on to larger television markets.  

Their smiling faces and recognizable voices were part of our daily routines. They appeared in our living rooms or other rooms of the house as time went on. We would set aside the evening newspaper, or stop whatever we were doing,  to watch them and hear what they had to say about the events of the day.

We gathered with families and friends to watch these familiar faces without truly realizing it was a shared time together because we didn’t live any other way.  

There was no Internet, no computers, no cell phones or tablets.  Watching the local news took on an important role in our lives as a place to learn the latest happenings in our neighborhoods and beyond.  

We can remember it as a time of trust in news reporting from journalists and broadcasters.  The words “Fake News” were not even remotely in our thoughts about these professionals.  

What time has taken away as it moved us into the 21st Century.  It meant we had to leave those years and our relationships with those TV folks behind.  Now they are memorable people as we contemplate our time with them during those special golden years.