Old Burying Ground in Greenfield volunteer work session coming up! – Reminder: Wednesday, October 3, 2018 – beginning at 8:30a.m.

If you missed joining the volunteers at the Old Burying Ground for the work session of September 30, 2018, this is a reminder that another one is scheduled for Wednesday, October 3rd starting at 8:30a.m.
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Always check the calendar on the Greenfield Historical Society’s website for upcoming events which include the “OBG” – Old Burying Ground work sessions!

To keep up to date with the latest progress made by the all-volunteer group who has been working for five years to restore the Old Burying Ground in Greenfield just click on the Past Events Section on the “A Look Back” tab found on the Greenfield Historical Society’s website.  

Next, take note of the “Tombstone Repair” and the dates of each of their work sessions thus far.  

Click on each of them to see the photographs and a recap of the type of work conducted during each of the work sessions.  

The Greenfield Historical Society volunteers are a well organized group of caring people who are well trained with cleaning, repairing, and resetting grave markers from the smallest to the largest; including the more difficult ones like the “Box Tombs” shown below.  

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Spotlighting the Temperance Movement in Ohio — Before there was Hillsboro; there was Greenfield.

Sharing this great article recently published from the “Pike County News Watchman” by Sherry M. Stanley in her “Rural Rendezvous” Column entitled: 

I eagerly read through the timeline history of the Temperance Movement in Ohio since I had an early collateral line ancestor who was involved in it; however, she took part in the Greenfield Liquor Raid of 1865 that has been largely forgotten about due to being overshadowed by Hillsboro’s crusade as stated in many accounts and in this article:

“At Hillsboro, Ohio, in 1873, a group of women led by Eliza J. Thompson, founder of the Women’s Temperance Crusade, marched in the streets, stopping at saloons to pray for patrons and saloon keepers, and demanding that saloon keepers sign a pledge to stop selling alcoholic beverages. The march in Hillsboro prompted additional marches in more than 130 communities.”

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Sharing my “Find A Grave” memorial for my collateral line Limes ancestor – Eliza Catherine “Kate” Marchant Gaskill.  I included as much information that I could compile about the July 10, 1865 Greenfield Liquor Raid and the subsequent 1867 trial those determined ladies of Greenfield faced because of their actions.  

These crusading women were ‘warriors’ for eradicating the evils of liquor in their village.  They had strong beliefs that were based on the tragedies that resulted in so much misery stemming from drunkenness; and they wanted to do something to stop it.  I can’t blame them.  For them it had to be akin to the opiate crisis we are experiencing today – overwhelming.  They didn’t want to sit on the sidelines and do nothing.  

 

Prohibition was later repealed as we know, but these ladies will be remembered as women who took a stand boldly for a cause they believed in and were proud of it throughout their whole lives.

 

ELIZA CATHERINE LIMES MARCHANT GASKILL STORY

Cincinnati Daily Gazette

Thursday, January 24, 1867 – Page 1:1 – Volume 78

“FEMALE SUASION WITH THE LIQUOR DEALERS.

The Greenfield Ladies on Trial.

Their Know Nothing Meeting – Female Efforts to Keep a Secret – Testimony of the Ladies”

 Correspondence of the Cincinnati Gazette.

 Hillsboro, O. January 22.

“Did you see any hatchets there?”

“I did see two. Miss Julia Lake had one, and Miss Limes one.  I asked what they were for.  The ladies about me did not know.  I asked Miss Limes.  She said that the ladies who invited her to come, asked her to bring a hatchet; she supposed the liquor was to be spilled, after it was given up.  I remarked ironically, yes.  I suppose after it is rolled out it will be spilled.  I joined the procession as everybody else did; there was no change in dress, didn’t see any ladies wearing pages to their dresses. “