Sharing from Heritage Avon Lake (Lorain County) – Monday, May 14th, 2018 – At 1:00p.m. Mary Milne: Epitaphs and Icons: Interpreting Gravestones

 

 

“Memorializing the dead with grave markers, headstones and tombstones, family burial plots were marked with rough stones, rocks or wood as a way to keep the dead from rising.  The deceased’s name, age and year of death were inscribed.  From 1650-1900 square shaped tombstones from slate and sandstone evolved with churchyard burials.  During the Victorian era (1837-1901) lavish and decorated gravestones included sculptured designs, artwork and symbols.  Marble, granite, iron and wood were popular materials from 1780 to the present. 

 

Mary Milne, professional genealogist, presents Epitaphs and Icons: Interpreting Gravestones on Monday, May 14, 2018 at the Avon Lake Public Library’s Waugaman Gallery.  She has investigated cemetery records, carvings, and statues that provide clues to aid genealogy research.  Learn how to interpret often-overlooked messages on gravestones. 

 

All events, which are free, will be held from 1 to 2 p.m. in the Waugaman Gallery at Avon Lake Public Library, 32649 Electric Blvd.

 

Heritage Avon Lake is a local history organization that collects, preserves, and promotes oral, written, and physical history. For more information, visit www.heritageavonlake.org or call 440.549.4425.”

 

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Mark Your Calendar for Sunday, April 22, 2018 – Beginning at 9:00AM – Restoration Project Session at the Old Burying Ground in Greenfield, Highland County, Ohio

 Sharing from the Greenfield Historical Society.:

***Sunday, April 22, 2018***

Beginning at 9:00a.m.

“Since 2014, the Old Burying Ground (OBG) in Greenfield, Ohio, has been undergoing work by a group of dedicated volunteers. Throughout each year, work sessions have been held by project leaders Scott and Venus Andersen and John King.

Contact John King at the Greenfield Historical Society if you plan to attend.”

John King’s email address: jfking@earthlink.net

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Old Burial Ground next to Travellers Rest 

“Please join other volunteers as we continue to make improvements to the Old Burial Ground. 

We’ll start at 9:00 a.m. and work as long as we have the energy. 

Come help and stay as long as you can.

Join us for an upcoming work session. You can stay as long as you like. 

We will help you get started if you have not participated previously. 

Tasks range from cleaning stones, straightening stones, recording information, etc. 

We post our scheduled sessions on the Greenfield Historical Society website calendar.” 

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(Select photographs below 
from the 2014 Old Burying Ground Project

by Linda Jean Limes Ellis)

 

Link to the document for:

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The Old Burying Ground in Greenfield

on “Find A Grave”.

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Map

Uncovering the Mystery of the Relationship of Mike Zagorsky and Mike Sherwood as Father and Son -Thanks to my Own Unexpected DNA connection.

Michael (AKA Mike) Zagorsky was my grand-uncle on my mother’s side of the family.  He was an older brother to my grandfather, Andrew Zagorsky.  Both brothers immigrated to the Lorain/Elyria area in Lorain County, Ohio. 

Mike Zagorsky’s wife was Marie (AKA Mary) Novascek Zagorsky.

Mike Zagorsky immigrated to America in April, 1907, however, his wife Marie and a daughter named Anna, immigrated to America in September 1907.  

For Mike Zagorsky.:

“Mihály Zagorszky’s ship manifest shows that he was born in Stajer…something. This is possibly Stájerlakanina, now Anina in Romania, 20 miles from Reșița. Mihály was joining his brother Andreas in Lorain, Ohio:

Name: Mihaly Zagorszky

Gender: Male

Race: German

Birthdate: 1874

Age: 33

Arrival Date: 10 Apr 1907

Port of Departure: Bremen, Germany

As stated on Marie Zagorsky’s Petition for Naturalization, she married Mike Zagorsky on May 5, 1905 in “Resicza” Austra-Hungary. 

On Marie Zagorsky’s Petition for Naturalization there is information about her husband Mike Zagorsky being naturalized December 2, 1924 with a certificate number.  Unfortunately, that record was not able to be located.

Continuing with my research, I accessed some historical newspaper articles for Mike or Michael Zagorsky in the “Elyria Chronicle-Telegram”.  That is how I learned of his and his family’s visits to Mike Sherwood and his family who lived in Cleveland. 

One such brief mention stood out for me.  It was the September 21, 1937 “Brief” only a one sentence statement that caught my eye right away.: 

“Mr. and Mrs. Mike Zagorsky entertained Sunday the former’s son and family, Mr. and Mrs. Mike Sherwood of Cleveland.” 

If correct, Mike Sherwood was a son of Mike Zagorsky.  I did some follow up with one set of estate papers that didn’t produce much for proof even though Mike Sherwood and his wife were named in them.  But more recently, another set of estate papers for the administration of Mike Zagorsky’s estate did show Mike Sherwood and named him as a son!  I thought wow, my thinking is on track.  

Now on to DNA.:  About a year ago I did my DNA test with Ancestry.  I rather quickly learned that I have a 3rd cousin match for the grand-daughter of Mike Sherwood who also did her DNA!

Unfortunately, the older generations before her are now deceased and she had no knowledge of someone named Mike Zagorsky.  Even so, can DNA lie?  Somehow I don’t think so.

I have more research to do, but not being assured at this point that I’ll learn more than I already have, I feel that the DNA results have worked to help me reach a more solid conclusion. 

Anna Edna Zagorsky Provoznik was definitely Marie Zagorsky’s daughter, however, not 100% sure she was Mike Zagorsky’s daughter as she was born prior to their marriage.  But, she was the administratrix for his estate — Mike Zagorsky died intestate.  

There are more stones to uncover and mysteries to solve, but I wanted to share at this juncture while so much of the recent information that has come to light is fresh on my mind. 

Below is a random sampling of some of the documents I have discovered in my research that relate to Mike and Marie Zagorsky as well as to “the former’s son” Mike Sherwood.  

Elyria Chronicle Telegram MAY 9 1939 - ZAGORSKY PROVOZNIK SHERWOOD - WITH FRAME & TEXTElyria Chronicle Telegram NOVEMBER 2 1937 - ANDREW AND MIKE ZAGORSKY - WITH FRAME & TEXTElyria Chronicle Telegram October 19, 1937 - ZAGORSKY PROVOZNIK SHERWOOD - WITH FRAME & TEXTElyria Chronicle Telegram -September 21 1937 - MIKE ZAGORSKY AND MIKE SHERWOOD - SON REFERENCE WITH TEXT AND FRAMEMARIE ZAGORSKY PETITION FOR NATURALIZATION - 1MARIE ZAGORSKY PETITION FOR NATURALIZATION - 2MARIE ZAGORSKY PETITION FOR NATURALIZATION - 3MARIE ZAGORSKY SHIP MANIFESTMICHAEL SHERWOOD - BIRTH RECORD - BIRTH RETURN 1899 - CUYAHOGA COUNTY OHIO FROM FAMILY SEARCH

Above is a Delayed Birth record for Michael Sherwood – note there is no surname for the father; stating only Michael. 

The typed page appears to be affixed over an older piece of paper that once served as the form for a “Return of Birth”. 

Below is the Ship Manifest for Mike Zagorsky – Line #16

MIHALY ZAGORSZKY SHIP MANIFEST LINE 16 - MICHAEL ZAGORSKY CLOSE UPMIKE ZAGORSKY DEATH CERTIFICATEMIKE ZAGORSKY ESTATE - 1942 - Widow daughter son - 1

Spotlighting the Temperance Movement in Ohio — Before there was Hillsboro; there was Greenfield.

Sharing this great article recently published from the “Pike County News Watchman” by Sherry M. Stanley in her “Rural Rendezvous” Column entitled: 

I eagerly read through the timeline history of the Temperance Movement in Ohio since I had an early collateral line ancestor who was involved in it; however, she took part in the Greenfield Liquor Raid of 1865 that has been largely forgotten about due to being overshadowed by Hillsboro’s crusade as stated in many accounts and in this article:

“At Hillsboro, Ohio, in 1873, a group of women led by Eliza J. Thompson, founder of the Women’s Temperance Crusade, marched in the streets, stopping at saloons to pray for patrons and saloon keepers, and demanding that saloon keepers sign a pledge to stop selling alcoholic beverages. The march in Hillsboro prompted additional marches in more than 130 communities.”

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Sharing my “Find A Grave” memorial for my collateral line Limes ancestor – Eliza Catherine “Kate” Marchant Gaskill.  I included as much information that I could compile about the July 10, 1865 Greenfield Liquor Raid and the subsequent 1867 trial those determined ladies of Greenfield faced because of their actions.  

These crusading women were ‘warriors’ for eradicating the evils of liquor in their village.  They had strong beliefs that were based on the tragedies that resulted in so much misery stemming from drunkenness; and they wanted to do something to stop it.  I can’t blame them.  For them it had to be akin to the opiate crisis we are experiencing today – overwhelming.  They didn’t want to sit on the sidelines and do nothing.  

 

Prohibition was later repealed as we know, but these ladies will be remembered as women who took a stand boldly for a cause they believed in and were proud of it throughout their whole lives.

 

ELIZA CATHERINE LIMES MARCHANT GASKILL STORY

Cincinnati Daily Gazette

Thursday, January 24, 1867 – Page 1:1 – Volume 78

“FEMALE SUASION WITH THE LIQUOR DEALERS.

The Greenfield Ladies on Trial.

Their Know Nothing Meeting – Female Efforts to Keep a Secret – Testimony of the Ladies”

 Correspondence of the Cincinnati Gazette.

 Hillsboro, O. January 22.

“Did you see any hatchets there?”

“I did see two. Miss Julia Lake had one, and Miss Limes one.  I asked what they were for.  The ladies about me did not know.  I asked Miss Limes.  She said that the ladies who invited her to come, asked her to bring a hatchet; she supposed the liquor was to be spilled, after it was given up.  I remarked ironically, yes.  I suppose after it is rolled out it will be spilled.  I joined the procession as everybody else did; there was no change in dress, didn’t see any ladies wearing pages to their dresses. “

Recently Colorized Photographs of my Early Childhood

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It has been an interesting experience to have some of my early childhood photographs colorized.  Afterward, adding a frame around each one with a description to identify the important information about the photograph is another step in this process I’ve learned.  

I has been heartwarming to have a new version of my childhood photographs that I am growing to like more than I thought I would — after viewing only the original black and white versions for so many years.

Scanning original photographs to save & share, and even improve them brings to us a renewed sense of their importance in preserving the history of our lives and the changing times we relive through them.