Spotlighting the Temperance Movement in Ohio — Before there was Hillsboro; there was Greenfield.

Sharing this great article recently published from the “Pike County News Watchman” by Sherry M. Stanley in her “Rural Rendezvous” Column entitled: 

I eagerly read through the timeline history of the Temperance Movement in Ohio since I had an early collateral line ancestor who was involved in it; however, she took part in the Greenfield Liquor Raid of 1865 that has been largely forgotten about due to being overshadowed by Hillsboro’s crusade as stated in many accounts and in this article:

“At Hillsboro, Ohio, in 1873, a group of women led by Eliza J. Thompson, founder of the Women’s Temperance Crusade, marched in the streets, stopping at saloons to pray for patrons and saloon keepers, and demanding that saloon keepers sign a pledge to stop selling alcoholic beverages. The march in Hillsboro prompted additional marches in more than 130 communities.”

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Sharing my “Find A Grave” memorial for my collateral line Limes ancestor – Eliza Catherine “Kate” Marchant Gaskill.  I included as much information that I could compile about the July 10, 1865 Greenfield Liquor Raid and the subsequent 1867 trial those determined ladies of Greenfield faced because of their actions.  

These crusading women were ‘warriors’ for eradicating the evils of liquor in their village.  They had strong beliefs that were based on the tragedies that resulted in so much misery stemming from drunkenness; and they wanted to do something to stop it.  I can’t blame them.  For them it had to be akin to the opiate crisis we are experiencing today – overwhelming.  They didn’t want to sit on the sidelines and do nothing.  

 

Prohibition was later repealed as we know, but these ladies will be remembered as women who took a stand boldly for a cause they believed in and were proud of it throughout their whole lives.

 

ELIZA CATHERINE LIMES MARCHANT GASKILL STORY

Cincinnati Daily Gazette

Thursday, January 24, 1867 – Page 1:1 – Volume 78

“FEMALE SUASION WITH THE LIQUOR DEALERS.

The Greenfield Ladies on Trial.

Their Know Nothing Meeting – Female Efforts to Keep a Secret – Testimony of the Ladies”

 Correspondence of the Cincinnati Gazette.

 Hillsboro, O. January 22.

“Did you see any hatchets there?”

“I did see two. Miss Julia Lake had one, and Miss Limes one.  I asked what they were for.  The ladies about me did not know.  I asked Miss Limes.  She said that the ladies who invited her to come, asked her to bring a hatchet; she supposed the liquor was to be spilled, after it was given up.  I remarked ironically, yes.  I suppose after it is rolled out it will be spilled.  I joined the procession as everybody else did; there was no change in dress, didn’t see any ladies wearing pages to their dresses. “

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Recently Colorized Photographs of my Early Childhood

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It has been an interesting experience to have some of my early childhood photographs colorized.  Afterward, adding a frame around each one with a description to identify the important information about the photograph is another step in this process I’ve learned.  

I has been heartwarming to have a new version of my childhood photographs that I am growing to like more than I thought I would — after viewing only the original black and white versions for so many years.

Scanning original photographs to save & share, and even improve them brings to us a renewed sense of their importance in preserving the history of our lives and the changing times we relive through them.

Find A Grave Changes Are a Coming!

A Heads up for those of us who are contributors and users of Find A Grave, which as most of us know by now, has been taken over by Ancestry.com!  More changes are to come with the Find A Grave website.

Click Here to read about upcoming changes for Find A Grave.  

Now might be a good time to go into your “Contributor Tools” and download your data.:

“Download Your Data”

“You can download your records for a cemetery or virtual cemetery by choosing it from the list below. The data will download as a tab-delimited Excel file. This format can be imported into a variety of programs. Add cemeteries to your My Cemeteries list to see them listed here.”

Just a tip:  I use a Windows 7 64bit desk top computer and when I downloaded a cemetery file it saved it to a .txt format instead of an Excel format.  I changed the .txt to a .xls and the file then opened up in Excel for me.  I could also re-save the .xls into a .xlsx file.  I still have Office 2007 on my computer.  So, if your downloaded cemeteries default to .txt this would be a workaround for you.