Spotlighting a New Update from “Past Lives Photography” that also Brought Back a Memory and a Sad Discovery for me.

Beth Wilson Shoemaker and her “A Grave Sight Cemetery Photographs by BAWS” posted a new link on Facebook, on March 3, 2018, connecting to her Past Lives Photography Blog (a link for it is also included in this blog) with an update detailing her visit to the almost lost and forgotten Mastin Family Cemetery in Clay Twp., Scioto County, Ohio.  

Learning of Beth’s discovery led to my own recollection of someone who helped me in 1997 with documenting a relatively obscure Ohio cemetery — the Friends (Quaker) Cemetery in North Lewisburg, Champaign County Ohio.  

I am writing about surveyor, Mr. James L. Murphy, who, himself, had paid an earlier visit to the Mastin Cemetery.  Thankfully, he shared his research results on the USGenWeb site on November 16, 2007.  He provided his listing of the inscriptions on the gravestones he found at the Mastin Cemetery.  His work included surveying the little cemetery for the Ohio Historic Inventory . The cemetery information was added to the official records at the Ohio Historical Society (now the Ohio History Connection).  The OHI number for the Mastin Cemetery is SCI0046813.

So, while searching for information on the Mastin (Mastin Family) Cemetery in Scioto County, I decided to do a “Google” search for James L. Murphy who I had not communicated with for several years following our exchanges regarding the Friends Cemetery.  

Sadly, I learned that he had passed away on October 8th, 2012.  

I dedicate this blog post to James L. Murphy whose assistance helped me complete the first Ohio Historic Inventory Form that I finished in 1997.  Over the years, I completed seven more OHI forms for other early Ohio cemeteries.

Sharing James L. Murphy’s “Forgotten” Cemeteries and the Ohio Historic Inventory publication.  

Please take a moment to read it, and if you feel so inclined, contact the Preservation Office of the Ohio History Connection to learn more how these forms can help protect Ohio’s almost forgotten cemeteries.  

 

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Have a Merry and White Christmas!

Merry Christmas to all who celebrate this joyous day!  

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Sharing this story from Wooster, Ohio, published by the “Akron Beacon Journal

By Paula Schleis

Beacon Journal/Ohio.com that is so appropriate for today. 

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ALL SAINTS CEMETERY - 12-7-2014 -- CHRISTMAS THEME

(Photo above from All Saints Cemetery in Northfield, Ohio.)

(Photo by Linda Jean Limes Ellis)

Spotlighting the Ridgelawn Cemetery in Elyria, Ohio.

The photographs below are from my October 17, 2017 visit to Ridgelawn Cemetery in Elyria, Ohio

 It was my first visit, and one that was much overdue.  These are just a small sampling of the historic gravestones and monuments to be found at this early Ohio cemetery.  

The earliest burial that I found belongs to Nathaniel Porter who died in June (13th?) 1822.

  His “Find A Grave” memorial contains an extensive biographical write-up.  He was re-interred from another cemetery, however.  Links to memorials for his spouse and children are included with his memorial.  

A visitor can spend several splendid hours exploring Ridgelawn Cemetery in Elyria and easily become immersed in its landscape of amazing variety of trees among towering military monuments. One is topped with a soaring Eagle while another has a life-size Civil War soldier painted in appropriate Union Regimental colors. 

The 1820s – 1840s delicately carved grave markers there are indeed remarkable in their simplicity and not to be missed before you leave.  Several impressive mausoleums include those that are reminiscent of small sandstone houses! 

A visitor cannot help but be drawn to the grand wrought iron gated family plot of Heman Ely and his descendants.  


Ridgelawn Cemetery is a sacred place  where pioneer history awaits visitors who are fortunate enough to come and walk its grounds.