Spotlighting the Temperance Movement in Ohio — Before there was Hillsboro; there was Greenfield.

Sharing this great article recently published from the “Pike County News Watchman” by Sherry M. Stanley in her “Rural Rendezvous” Column entitled: 

I eagerly read through the timeline history of the Temperance Movement in Ohio since I had an early collateral line ancestor who was involved in it; however, she took part in the Greenfield Liquor Raid of 1865 that has been largely forgotten about due to being overshadowed by Hillsboro’s crusade as stated in many accounts and in this article:

“At Hillsboro, Ohio, in 1873, a group of women led by Eliza J. Thompson, founder of the Women’s Temperance Crusade, marched in the streets, stopping at saloons to pray for patrons and saloon keepers, and demanding that saloon keepers sign a pledge to stop selling alcoholic beverages. The march in Hillsboro prompted additional marches in more than 130 communities.”

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Sharing my “Find A Grave” memorial for my collateral line Limes ancestor – Eliza Catherine “Kate” Marchant Gaskill.  I included as much information that I could compile about the July 10, 1865 Greenfield Liquor Raid and the subsequent 1867 trial those determined ladies of Greenfield faced because of their actions.  

These crusading women were ‘warriors’ for eradicating the evils of liquor in their village.  They had strong beliefs that were based on the tragedies that resulted in so much misery stemming from drunkenness; and they wanted to do something to stop it.  I can’t blame them.  For them it had to be akin to the opiate crisis we are experiencing today – overwhelming.  They didn’t want to sit on the sidelines and do nothing.  

 

Prohibition was later repealed as we know, but these ladies will be remembered as women who took a stand boldly for a cause they believed in and were proud of it throughout their whole lives.

 

ELIZA CATHERINE LIMES MARCHANT GASKILL STORY

Cincinnati Daily Gazette

Thursday, January 24, 1867 – Page 1:1 – Volume 78

“FEMALE SUASION WITH THE LIQUOR DEALERS.

The Greenfield Ladies on Trial.

Their Know Nothing Meeting – Female Efforts to Keep a Secret – Testimony of the Ladies”

 Correspondence of the Cincinnati Gazette.

 Hillsboro, O. January 22.

“Did you see any hatchets there?”

“I did see two. Miss Julia Lake had one, and Miss Limes one.  I asked what they were for.  The ladies about me did not know.  I asked Miss Limes.  She said that the ladies who invited her to come, asked her to bring a hatchet; she supposed the liquor was to be spilled, after it was given up.  I remarked ironically, yes.  I suppose after it is rolled out it will be spilled.  I joined the procession as everybody else did; there was no change in dress, didn’t see any ladies wearing pages to their dresses. “

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A Look Back at Life 130 years ago in the Village of Greenfield (Highland County) Ohio

Recalling how life was 130 years ago in Greenfield, Highland County Ohio, where many of the Limes ancestors lived in the village — and not far from it — in both Highland and Fayette Counties.

This snippet from the “Greenfield” column includes a tidbit about Mrs. William Limes. The Mrs. William Limes in this story was Savilla Jane Beals (Beals was often shown as Bales back then; and so we see it in this instance.) Her father was Noble Beals and her mother was Margaret Ann Berry Beals. Savilla Jane was married to William Limes II.  Their first-born child was named Noble Harrison “AKA Harry” Limes.

Included are the rest of the Greenfield news items of the day.

Greenfield is the second largest city in Highland County after the county seat of Hillsboro.

Hope you enjoy the look back!

 

The Ohio Genealogical Society is seeking writers who wish to share their historical accounts of the lives of those interred in Ohio’s Cemeteries — So here is an opportunity to share your knowledge of your favorite Ohio Cemetery!

Sharing….
 
From Susan Dunlap Lee, the Senior Editor of the “Ohio Genealogical Society Quarterly” publication.
 
OGS is seeking contributing authors for this publication on the topic of preserving cemeteries through sharing of historical accounts of those interred in them.  Susan has provided the following information.:
 
“..articles are more about the people in the cemetery, their relationship to everyone there, point out military graves, personal data. Sort of “My Town” kind of article that you can put together from those who are buried in the cemetery. Far from the usual cemetery inscriptions.”
 
Susan can be contacted at the following email address: ogsq@ogs.org.
 
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Per Susan, it is not a requirement to be an Ohio Genealogical Society member to submit a story for publication.
 
If you are a member of OGS, or have access to a library that contains OGS publications, you can reference the feature articles about the Stratford Cemetery in Delaware as an example for the type of content, etc. that Susan is seeking for cemetery articles.
 
Example.:
 
From Vol. 56 No 3. 2016 OGSQ (Ohio Genealogical Society Quarterly starting on Page 320.:
 
“Stratford Cemetery: Restoring a Pioneer Burial Ground in Delaware County, Ohio”
Based on report by John Tetz
(Interview by Laurel Sheppard, OGSQ Assistant Editor)
 
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Please contact Susan Dunlap Lee directly at ogsq@ogs.org if you are interested and/or have any questions.
Thank you!