Celebrating the 100th Birthday of Bette Jean Limes Ruckle Bell!

BETTE BELL 100 BIRTHDAY - 3-4-2019 - WITH TEXT AND FRAME.jpg

When I think about Bette Jean and her Limes Family Ancestry, I think about the fact her great-grandfather, Harmon Limes (son of William and Athaliah Doster Limes) was born, per his tombstone at the Staunton Cemetery in Fayette County, Ohio, in Virginia in 1805.

My great-grandfather, John Thomas Limes, was born in Ohio in 1851. 

Bette Jean is the only Limes person who has reached the incredible milestone birthday of 100 years! So this milestone is so worth noting and celebrating today!!

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The Eagles Building in Lorain, Ohio – A favorite historic building crumbling due to lack of restoration work.

A visit to my hometown of Lorain, Ohio on February 5th, 2019 brought an unanticipated scene – part of Broadway being cordoned off due to some loose structural pieces of the Eagles Building that had broken off near the top of the building and crashed down to the street and alley; thus alerting those in the area that there was a potentially serious problem.  

BLUE RIBBON GRAPHIC FOR USE ON CEMETERY BLOG

The Elyria “Chronicle-Telegram” has published an in-depth story about this incident with the Eagles Building on February 5, 2019 along with a video. 

BLUE RIBBON GRAPHIC FOR USE ON CEMETERY BLOG

Below are photos of the Eagles Building that I took. 

The top photo was taken November 23, 2012 – with a close up view of the upper left portion of the building, and the lower photo was taken February 5, 2019.  

BLUE RIBBON GRAPHIC FOR USE ON CEMETERY BLOG

LORAIN EAGLES BUILDING - 11-23-2012

Below is a close up of the left upper portion of the Eagles Building – November 23, 2012 –  showing more details of the structural deterioration.

EAGLES BUILDING CLOSE UP - NOVEMBER 23 2012 WITH TEXT AND FRAME

KODAK Digital Still Camera

BLUE RIBBON GRAPHIC FOR USE ON CEMETERY BLOG

 

BLUE RIBBON GRAPHIC FOR USE ON CEMETERY BLOG

Dan Brady’s Blog Post about the Eagles Building – September 10, 2012

Spotlighting my grandfather, Winfield Scott Limes, and other Limes ancestors who made the news in the “Columbus Dispatch” in the 20th Century

My paternal grandfather, Winfield Scott Limes, has been among my most fascinating and personally rewarding ancestors to research.  I remember seeing him as a young child since he died when I was age eleven.  I remember sitting across from him at our dining room table on Sundays when he came over for a big Sunday dinner that my mother would make.  

He has been featured here in several posts, but not with exactly the same focus about his life. That’s because I just recently discovered a 1906 article in the “Columbus Dispatch” that my grandfather had submitted and they saw fit to publish.  My grandfather, “Scott”, had lived in Columbus a number of years when around 1905 he and his wife, Essie Lillian (Lombard) Limes, and 4 sons — Ernest, Albert, Tom, and Harry — all moved to Lorain (as it turned out it was a temporary move.  The family returned to Columbus around 1907.  Then later in the 1920s, my grandparents, my father Harry, and later Albert, all moved back to Lorain County and made it their permanent residence.)

Scott Limes was not only a member of the International Wood Wire & Metal Lathers’ Union, Local #1 in Columbus, Ohio, but he was one of the founders of the union itself in 1899. During his time in Lorain he changed his union membership affiliation to Local #171.

wood wire & metal lath pin 1899

In the November 26, 1906, with “Higher Wages Attract”, we find “Scott” Limes writing about the encouraging building prospects he saw in the city of Lorain.  As it turned out for him, those prospects rippled out to the wider area including Sandusky.  That is because he and his two brothers (John Warren and Thomas Limes) did lathing work on the grand original Breakers Hotel at Cedar Point that when completed was placed on the National Register of Historic Places — that was until sadly it lost that status years later due to modern upgrades made to the buildings. 

Scott also felt it important for the “Columbus Dispatch
to include how excited he was that Local #171 in Lorain County won a baseball championship in that city in 1906. He was a part of that team playing as a young 21-year-old.  I had known he played baseball with the team because of the two photographs I had inherited of him wearing his Local #171 baseball uniform.  This published article tells me that my two photographs could have been from 1906.  How unexpectedly excited it was for me learn the year he probably wore the baseball uniform in those photographs.  I was able to have one colorized, which I feel brings him back to life for me; sort to speak, because it is such a life-like version.

As I continued with my research of the “Columbus Dispatch” I found additional stories or ‘tidbits’ with references to other Limes family members including the first marriage of my uncle Albert Limes.

Below are some of the stories I found that help round out the lives of some of my Limes relatives and ancestors who lived in Columbus, Ohio.

scott limes collage of 1906 columbus dispatch story and lather baseball photos - 3

winfield scott limes local 171 baseball in bent position - restored & colorized - 1-23-2019 with text and frame - new

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Sharing my tribute to my father, Harry Limes, on Father’s Day, 2018

It was 30 years ago, on March 22, 2018, when my dear father departed this life a few months shy of his 84th birthday.  He died due to having prostate cancer.  I remember his saying that he had hoped he would make it to age 90.  Sadly, that did not happen for him.  
 
But, for the past 30 years, and as long as I live and have my mind and memories, I will remember him, and take comfort on days like Father’s Day, Christmas, Thanksgiving, and his birthday, to devote more time to reflecting on him and his words of wisdom given to me over the years; not the least of which was: “always live within your means.”  
 
My father lived during the Roaring 20s and the Great Depression.  The 1930s was a much different type of decade to live through with its austerity and hardships that meant an adjustment from the carefree and less stressful decade that had ended with a crash; quite literally, when the U. S. Stock Market crashed in October of 1929.  I know my father’s lifestyle altered drastically during the 1930s; but I also know he found ways to cope and make it a time to try new things and start a new line of work that would last the rest of his life. 
 
Sharing here my “Find A Grave” memorial that I created for my father.,Harry Limes.  He was named after his mother’s youngest brother, Harry Lombard.  The memorial includes a biography about my father’s life that I compiled from personal knowledge and extended research about him.  I can only hope that he would be pleased, and it would meet with his approval.