Celebrating the 100th Birthday of Bette Jean Limes Ruckle Bell!

BETTE BELL 100 BIRTHDAY - 3-4-2019 - WITH TEXT AND FRAME.jpg

When I think about Bette Jean and her Limes Family Ancestry, I think about the fact her great-grandfather, Harmon Limes (son of William and Athaliah Doster Limes) was born, per his tombstone at the Staunton Cemetery in Fayette County, Ohio, in Virginia in 1805.

My great-grandfather, John Thomas Limes, was born in Ohio in 1851. 

Bette Jean is the only Limes person who has reached the incredible milestone birthday of 100 years! So this milestone is so worth noting and celebrating today!!

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Spotlighting my grandfather, Winfield Scott Limes, and other Limes ancestors who made the news in the “Columbus Dispatch” in the 20th Century

My paternal grandfather, Winfield Scott Limes, has been among my most fascinating and personally rewarding ancestors to research.  I remember seeing him as a young child since he died when I was age eleven.  I remember sitting across from him at our dining room table on Sundays when he came over for a big Sunday dinner that my mother would make.  

He has been featured here in several posts, but not with exactly the same focus about his life. That’s because I just recently discovered a 1906 article in the “Columbus Dispatch” that my grandfather had submitted and they saw fit to publish.  My grandfather, “Scott”, had lived in Columbus a number of years when around 1905 he and his wife, Essie Lillian (Lombard) Limes, and 4 sons — Ernest, Albert, Tom, and Harry — all moved to Lorain (as it turned out it was a temporary move.  The family returned to Columbus around 1907.  Then later in the 1920s, my grandparents, my father Harry, and later Albert, all moved back to Lorain County and made it their permanent residence.)

Scott Limes was not only a member of the International Wood Wire & Metal Lathers’ Union, Local #1 in Columbus, Ohio, but he was one of the founders of the union itself in 1899. During his time in Lorain he changed his union membership affiliation to Local #171.

wood wire & metal lath pin 1899

In the November 26, 1906, with “Higher Wages Attract”, we find “Scott” Limes writing about the encouraging building prospects he saw in the city of Lorain.  As it turned out for him, those prospects rippled out to the wider area including Sandusky.  That is because he and his two brothers (John Warren and Thomas Limes) did lathing work on the grand original Breakers Hotel at Cedar Point that when completed was placed on the National Register of Historic Places — that was until sadly it lost that status years later due to modern upgrades made to the buildings. 

Scott also felt it important for the “Columbus Dispatch
to include how excited he was that Local #171 in Lorain County won a baseball championship in that city in 1906. He was a part of that team playing as a young 21-year-old.  I had known he played baseball with the team because of the two photographs I had inherited of him wearing his Local #171 baseball uniform.  This published article tells me that my two photographs could have been from 1906.  How unexpectedly excited it was for me learn the year he probably wore the baseball uniform in those photographs.  I was able to have one colorized, which I feel brings him back to life for me; sort to speak, because it is such a life-like version.

As I continued with my research of the “Columbus Dispatch” I found additional stories or ‘tidbits’ with references to other Limes family members including the first marriage of my uncle Albert Limes.

Below are some of the stories I found that help round out the lives of some of my Limes relatives and ancestors who lived in Columbus, Ohio.

scott limes collage of 1906 columbus dispatch story and lather baseball photos - 3

winfield scott limes local 171 baseball in bent position - restored & colorized - 1-23-2019 with text and frame - new

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Cemetery vandalism continues at Ohio cemeteries both large and small

From the “Herald-Dispatch” in Huntington, West Virginia, published on July 3rd by Luke Creasy are details from the latest update about the current state of the damage at the The Rome-Proctorville Cemetery in Proctorville, Lawrence County, Ohio.

Sharing these excerpts from this story because I feel they are insightful, and are definitely good to know and understand if one of your ancestor’s stones was damaged — not knocked over and no other type of damage.

We learn from the details that the degree and type of damage to a grave marker can dictate if those responsible for the cemetery accepts responsibility to properly repair it.

Also, please note that it is crucial to be sure who is responsible for a cemetery. The example as stated here demonstrates that if there is an older cemetery adjacent to a newer cemetery there might be a different owner for the older one. Thus, if both cemeteries suffer damage it cannot automatically be assumed that the same entity (i.e. township, church, village, etc.) owns both cemeteries and will handle remediation of damages at both cemeteries.:

“Rome-Proctorville Cemetery caretaker Ron Jenkins said he wants to get the headstones in the upright position as quickly as possible and is working with Lawson Monument Company in Huntington to get the headstones off the ground and resealed. Jenkins estimated the cost at $150 per headstone.Lawson began repairs at the cemetery on Monday morning. Fourteen stones were picked up, placed and sealed on Monday. Jenkins said Lawson has been very accommodating, and remaining repairs will be made by the end of the week.

“(Lawson) said some of them have permanent damage on them, but we’re not going to be responsible in replacing those. We’re just trying to get them all set back up and sealed back down.”

Permanent damage to a gravestone includes any surface damage to the stone such as cracks, scratches and chips. Jenkins said that families that have been affected by permanent damage will not be forced to replace headstones but do have the option of purchasing new stones.

In response to the crime, Bowen said the cemetery will institute increased security steps moving forward. High-definition surveillance cameras soon will be added, as well as additional measures that Bowen did not want to disclose at the time. He said the cemetery’s goal is to prevent this situation from happening in the future.

According to Jenkins, there were additional headstones overturned in the Old Rome Cemetery that neighbors Rome-Proctorville; however, they are not responsible for upkeep on those grounds.”

Some News Stories about recent cemetery vandalism in Ohio.:

 From The “Toledo Blade”: Thursday, June 28, 2018

Forest Cemetery in Toledo:

 “Headstones Again Vandalized at Forest Cemetery”

Contact Sarah Elms at selms@theblade.com419-724-6103, or on Twitter @BySarahElms.

“More than 100 headstones have been toppled at Forest Cemetery this month, and many of the vandalized grave-markers date back to the 1800s.

The most recent act of vandalism — about 12 headstones knocked over — was discovered Wednesday, Cemeteries Foreman Luke Smigielski said. The city runs five cemeteries, and only Forest Cemetery has experienced the vandalism this summer, he said.

More than 50 headstones were discovered knocked over on June 11, and another 42 were found toppled June 18. Forest Cemetery spans 94 acres and is home to more than 94,000 headstones, many of which weigh hundreds to thousands of pounds.”

Forest Cemetery in Toledo on “Find A Grave”The “Grave Tracker” – Forest Cemetery City of Toledo

From the “Dayton Daily News” – Monday, July 2, 2018 – Miamisburg, Montgomery County, Ohio:

“Highland Cemetery gravestone damaged over weekend”

Craig Weaver’s memorial on “Find A Grave”

Photo of Craig Weaver’s grave marker prior to its destruction

How a cemetery can bring life to the dead for researchers of early ancestors; later for them to unexpectedly learn a fellow researcher has passed away. This post is my tribute to Jane “Janie” Ellen Martin Whitty

It happened to me late last night before shutting down the computer.  Maybe it has happened to you too?  Let me try to explain. 

We contact other genealogical researchers; or vice versa.  We correspond with them for a while (maybe it was years ago before the Internet and handwritten letters with SASE’s were the preferred choice of contact, or using your manual or electric typewriter to compile a neatly typed up correspondence with SASE’s), but time moves on and the exchanges trailed off.  We move on to other unsolved genealogical mysteries that we realize lie before us begging to be solved. 

And, speaking of ‘trails’…quite often among our last steps on the trail to learn more about the lives of our ancestors are those that lead us to the cemetery where they were buried.  Invariably, we must pass by one grave marker after another; eagerly looking for the names on stones we are hoping to find.  We see veterans with gravestones or waving flags that tell us they served in an early war such as the Revolutionary War, War of 1812, or the Civil War.  Our ancestor may have also been a veteran.  Our slow walk through the cemetery gives us a good look at who else found eternal rest and peace at the same cemetery our ancestor and their family chose for themselves.  

So, whether you found your ancestor’s gravesite marked by a readable grave marker or not, you can gain a certain sense of who your ancestors’ neighbors were and how they also helped shape their community.  You want to learn more about these folks whom you suspect your ancestor often greeted after church was over, shook hands with, or served alongside in one of those long ago wars. 

You widen your research to include contacting those who are researching others buried at the same cemetery as your ancestor.  It is easier to do since the Internet now too!

So it was that last night I decided to once again read through one of the documents I had compiled several years ago about the Butcher (AKA Walnut Grove) Cemetery in North Lewisburg, in Champaign County, Ohio where a 3rd great-aunt and her first husband, daughter, and a grand-daughter were buried.  The document I chose to browse through was about just the veterans buried at this cemetery.  In the notes, I came across two emails I had copied into the document from a charming lady named Jane “Janie” Martin Whitty.  Her email address was “Whittyfun” which I thought was unique and yes, funny.  Jane had actually found me first and decided to contact me; and I am so glad that she did.

Sharing Jane “Janie” Martin Whitty’s email to me from April of 2010.:

“I am trying to contact you. I am the Evans/Underwood descendant of Charles E. Evans, Civil War Veteran buried in Butcher/Garwood Cemetery in Champaign County, Ohio, mentioned in your PDF file at the North Lewisburg website (I am OhioHeritage with the Evans/Underwood family histories).

Charles E. Evans was my Great-great grandfather, and I also have info on the Underwood family Francis Sara Jane Underwood, daughter of Amos Underwood, who was his, Charles E. Evans’, wife). Amos Underwood and Sara Jane Rossell, his wife, were also residents of North Lewisburg, Champaign County, Ohio and are in the 1881 Beers history.

I have pictures and histories on them. One of their grandchildren, Frankie Underwood is also buried in Butcher Cemetery (and a daughter and son of Charles E. Evans, as well, buried there with Charles).

If there is any info I can contribute for your excellent research of that area and those residents during that time, please contact me at this site

I would also very much appreciate if you could send me a copy or transcription of the news article on Charles E. Evans death May 10, 1888 (published in the Urbana Daily citizen you referenced on the additional info). I live in Florida and this article has eluded me. Our family history has handed down that his death was a “hunting accident” but suspected suicide and they weren’t sure.

I would like to know more and can tell you what I know from what was handed down.

My email is: whittyfun@juno.comwebsite of mine you found on Charles E. Evans

http://ohioheritage.tripod.com/ohioheritagephotoalbum/id1.html

(Cached version as of May 15, 2018.: http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:http://ohioheritage.tripod.com/ohioheritagephotoalbum/id1.html  )

Underwoodhttp://ohioheritage.tripod.com/ohioheritagephotoalbum/id8.html

Thank you so much for your excellent research!!

Regards,

Janie Martin Whitty – an Evans/Underwood Descendant…still researching after all these years.”

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Of course, I recall being totally thrilled to hear from Janie and her email (which I can no longer find in my Yahoo email account!) which thankfully remains in that document for me to re-read anytime I want! 

As I re-read Janie’s email again last night I felt an urging to see what Janie has been ‘up to’ since we last corresponded over 8 years ago.  A Google search gave me my answer.  Sadly, I learned that Janie passed away on December 25, 2015.  I was overcome with grief knowing that Janie had passed away.  With my feelings of loss came my guilt that I had not found a way to continue our correspondence so we could have stayed connected longer.  

Thus, I want to share this beautifully touching tribute to Jane “Janie” Martin Whitty that was compiled by her family and shared in a slideshow of photographs from Janie’s childhood years to her last years.  To me Janie and her research work live on, and what we shared with each other about her ancestors, my ancestors, the condition of the cemetery — all of it — remain with me in my memories and from re-reading her emails to me.  

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Sharing this moving and loving tribute to a dynamic lady who touched my life in a way I won’t ever forget.:

  Jane “Janie” Martin Whitty.

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Janie on Find A Grave

Jane “Janie” Martin Whitty’s Member Profile Memorial Page on Find A Grave

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BLUE RIBBON GRAPHIC FOR USE ON CEMETERY BLOG

A cemetery is a sacred ground that lives and breathes with a history that changed a community during its years of early development.  It may look long forgotten and neglected, but under the layers of vines, possibly intertwined with poison ivy, are what remain of the gravestones and monuments that mark the final resting places of those who came before us.  If they want to be found, they will, I always tell myself; and there is a reason they reach out to those of us who are receptive to them.  Not to just tell us their story, but to help us connect with each other!  

BLUE RIBBON GRAPHIC FOR USE ON CEMETERY BLOG

 

Sharing from Heritage Avon Lake (Lorain County) – Monday, May 14th, 2018 – At 1:00p.m. Mary Milne: Epitaphs and Icons: Interpreting Gravestones

 

 

“Memorializing the dead with grave markers, headstones and tombstones, family burial plots were marked with rough stones, rocks or wood as a way to keep the dead from rising.  The deceased’s name, age and year of death were inscribed.  From 1650-1900 square shaped tombstones from slate and sandstone evolved with churchyard burials.  During the Victorian era (1837-1901) lavish and decorated gravestones included sculptured designs, artwork and symbols.  Marble, granite, iron and wood were popular materials from 1780 to the present. 

 

Mary Milne, professional genealogist, presents Epitaphs and Icons: Interpreting Gravestones on Monday, May 14, 2018 at the Avon Lake Public Library’s Waugaman Gallery.  She has investigated cemetery records, carvings, and statues that provide clues to aid genealogy research.  Learn how to interpret often-overlooked messages on gravestones. 

 

All events, which are free, will be held from 1 to 2 p.m. in the Waugaman Gallery at Avon Lake Public Library, 32649 Electric Blvd.

 

Heritage Avon Lake is a local history organization that collects, preserves, and promotes oral, written, and physical history. For more information, visit www.heritageavonlake.org or call 440.549.4425.”