John Wildman Winder – Daguerreotypist and Photographer – His Stereoviews of Spring Grove Cemetery in Cincinnati document some important features of this grand cemetery’s earliest history

I research the Quaker (Friends) Cemetery in North Lewisburg, Champaign County, Ohio primarily because my 3rd great-grandfather, Harmon Limes, Jr., is buried there.  

His daughter, Adaline D. Limes, was married 4 times during her lifetime. Her first two marriages were to Winder brothers Aaron (1st) and Thomas (2nd). 

Thus, I studied some of the Winder family history and learned who their children were.
Aaron and Adaline were buried at the nearby Walnut Grove Cemetery (better known as the “Butcher” Cemetery) in North Lewisburg. 

Thomas Winder, who was older than Aaron, was buried with his first wife, Hannah Wildman Winder, at the Quaker (Friends) Cemetery in North Lewisburg. 

Thomas and Hannah’s oldest child was John Wildman Winder who left the North Lewisburg area and led a remarkable and productive life. His photographic work, particularly in Cincinnati, produced images of unparalleled historical significance; some of which survive today.  

His stereoviews give us a good glimpse of the grandeur of 1860’s – 1870’s life in Ohio’s “Queen City.” 

John Wildman Winder died April 9, 1900, at age 71, in New Orleans, Louisiana. He was buried in the Old Uvalde Cemetery in Uvalde, Texas.

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The book:  “Artists in Ohio 1787 1900 A Biographical Dictionary”- 2000; by Jeffrey Weidman – Project Director; John Wildman Winder is listed as a daguerreotype artist and photographer born in Ohio about 1828 and active in Cincinnati Hamilton from 1855 to 1873, as proprietor of Winder’s Great Western Ambrotype and Melainotype Gallery.”

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J.W. Winder – 1866 Cincinnati Bird’s Eye View

Scroll down to:

1866  CINCINNATI  BIRD’S-EYE  VIEW

   “The following section is of a rarely seen panorama of Cincinnati that was taken in 1866. This is the earliest panoramic photograph showing the details of the heart of the city. Of course the 1848 daguerreotype, seen on the Panoramas Page, of the waterfront was the first. J. W. Winder, a local photographer, took these photographs from the top of Mozart Hall which was just south of Sixth and Vine Streets (where later the Grand Theater would stand). The panorama was first seen at Winder’s Fourth Street Studio on July 28, 1866. The map below shows what area each photograph is viewing. The explanations that accompany each image was written 30-40 years ago so the buildings that are mentioned, for the most part, no longer stand. You will have to insert today’s structures into the explanation. There is no easy way to show this panorama but this was the best I could come up with. I believe the trouble you will have will be worth it.” 

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 (Scroll further down to view images of the 10 sections with descriptions)

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(Above)

1850 Census – Zane Township, Logan County, Ohio

Family of Thomas and Hannah (Wildman) Winder

 (Above two images)

1870 Census – Cincinnati, Ohio

 Family of John Wildman Winder and his wife Martha Adams Winder. Their children appear on the next page.

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Second Edition 

Below are references to John Wildman Winder 

(AKA John W. Winder or J. W. Winder

from the 

above-referenced publication:

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Circa 1865, 1867-1869

142 West Fourth Street,

Cincinnati, O.

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 Above

Tree Stump Monument for Andrew Henry Ernst 

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Between 1853 and 1867 the entrance buildings were erected at the principal gateway to the grounds, on the southern boundary, at Spring Grove avenue. They are from designs of Mr. James K. Wilson, in the Norman-Gothic style, one hundred and fifty feet long, and cost something over fifty thousand dollars. They include, besides apartments for the use of the directors and the superintendent, a large waiting-room for visitors. The commodious receiving vault, situated in the centre of the grounds, was considerably enlarged in the year 1859.”

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Spotlighting the Brecksville Cemetery in Brecksville, Cuyahoga County, Ohio

Below are some photographs taken during the September 23, 2018 tour of the Brecksville Cemetery 

The tour was almost two hours and it was quite well presented with the theme of “Headstones, Heroes, History, and Horticulture” — so the attendees, who also received a brochure about the cemetery, were treated to a guided study of these elements of this historic Northeast Ohio cemetery.  

WEAPING LADY ON TABLET MARKER BLACK AND WHITE GRAPHIC FOR USE IN CEMETERY BLOG

Click Here for the Brecksville Cemetery Tour Booklet posted online by the Brecksville Historical Association. 

Sharing my tribute to my father, Harry Limes, on Father’s Day, 2018

It was 30 years ago, on March 22, 2018, when my dear father departed this life a few months shy of his 84th birthday.  He died due to having prostate cancer.  I remember his saying that he had hoped he would make it to age 90.  Sadly, that did not happen for him.  
 
But, for the past 30 years, and as long as I live and have my mind and memories, I will remember him, and take comfort on days like Father’s Day, Christmas, Thanksgiving, and his birthday, to devote more time to reflecting on him and his words of wisdom given to me over the years; not the least of which was: “always live within your means.”  
 
My father lived during the Roaring 20s and the Great Depression.  The 1930s was a much different type of decade to live through with its austerity and hardships that meant an adjustment from the carefree and less stressful decade that had ended with a crash; quite literally, when the U. S. Stock Market crashed in October of 1929.  I know my father’s lifestyle altered drastically during the 1930s; but I also know he found ways to cope and make it a time to try new things and start a new line of work that would last the rest of his life. 
 
Sharing here my “Find A Grave” memorial that I created for my father.,Harry Limes.  He was named after his mother’s youngest brother, Harry Lombard.  The memorial includes a biography about my father’s life that I compiled from personal knowledge and extended research about him.  I can only hope that he would be pleased, and it would meet with his approval.  
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Find A Grave Changes Are a Coming!

A Heads up for those of us who are contributors and users of Find A Grave, which as most of us know by now, has been taken over by Ancestry.com!  More changes are to come with the Find A Grave website.

Click Here to read about upcoming changes for Find A Grave.  

Now might be a good time to go into your “Contributor Tools” and download your data.:

“Download Your Data”

“You can download your records for a cemetery or virtual cemetery by choosing it from the list below. The data will download as a tab-delimited Excel file. This format can be imported into a variety of programs. Add cemeteries to your My Cemeteries list to see them listed here.”

Just a tip:  I use a Windows 7 64bit desk top computer and when I downloaded a cemetery file it saved it to a .txt format instead of an Excel format.  I changed the .txt to a .xls and the file then opened up in Excel for me.  I could also re-save the .xls into a .xlsx file.  I still have Office 2007 on my computer.  So, if your downloaded cemeteries default to .txt this would be a workaround for you.