Couple sentenced in Delaware County cemetery fraud

Source: Couple sentenced in Delaware County cemetery fraud

 

Sharing the latest news from “The Columbus Dispatch” in Columbus, Ohio

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Battlefield Markers & Monuments: Johnson Island & McPherson’s Grave

Emerging Civil War

Emerging Civil War welcomes back Frank Jastrzembski to share about a recent trip and his musings on historical graveyard markers.

My wife reluctantly agreed to go on another of my weekend cemetery hunts. Only a few weeks before, we had taken another couple to visit Brevet Brigadier-General Orland Smith’s grave in Green Lawn Cemetery after a day at the Columbus Zoo. The best season to visit old cemeteries in Ohio is the fall. For our next trip, we headed west to hit both the Confederate cemetery on Johnson Island in Sandusky Bay and General James B. McPherson’s grave in Clyde, Ohio (a forty minute drive between the two).

Johnson Island Cemetery

This wasn’t the first time I had heard of the Johnson Island cemetery or of the prisoner-of-war camp. I had regrettably never made a point to visit the cemetery. I can now say that I had overlooked the most…

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A November visit to the 530 Shop, LTD. in Lorain, Ohio brings back memories

Sharing photos from a visit in late November to the 530 Shop, LTD in Lorain, Ohio

Lorain, Ohio is my hometown and the 530 Shop on Broadway has been there a long time. 

The building was constructed after the great Sandusky/Lorain Tornado struck on June 28, 1924. 

It is wonderful to see it still standing and being used as an antique store! 

The proprietor is Jani Oehlke.  It has been in the Oehlke family for several generations.  

Hope you enjoy the photos!

LORAIN - 530 SHOP - 11-28-2017 - ANTIQUE GLOBE LAMP AND POTTERYLORAIN - 530 SHOP - 11-28-2017 - JANI BY 530 BANNERLORAIN - 530 SHOP - 11-28-2017 - TOP OF TABLELORAIN - 530 SHOP - 11-28-2017 - WINDOW DISPLAY - 3LORAIN - 530 SHOP - 11-28-2017 - WINDOW DISPLAY - 2LORAIN - 530 SHOP - 11-28-2017 - INSIDE WINDOW DISPLAY - 1LORAIN - 530 SHOP - 11-28-2017 - WINDOW DISPLAY - 1LORAIN - 530 SHOP - 11-28-2017 -CABINET WITH CANDLE DISPLAY - 2LORAIN - 530 SHOP - 11-28-2017 - TALL CABINET WITH KEYS

Spotlighting the Temperance Movement in Ohio — Before there was Hillsboro; there was Greenfield.

Sharing this great article recently published from the “Pike County News Watchman” by Sherry M. Stanley in her “Rural Rendezvous” Column entitled: 

I eagerly read through the timeline history of the Temperance Movement in Ohio since I had an early collateral line ancestor who was involved in it; however, she took part in the Greenfield Liquor Raid of 1865 that has been largely forgotten about due to being overshadowed by Hillsboro’s crusade as stated in many accounts and in this article:

“At Hillsboro, Ohio, in 1873, a group of women led by Eliza J. Thompson, founder of the Women’s Temperance Crusade, marched in the streets, stopping at saloons to pray for patrons and saloon keepers, and demanding that saloon keepers sign a pledge to stop selling alcoholic beverages. The march in Hillsboro prompted additional marches in more than 130 communities.”

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Sharing my “Find A Grave” memorial for my collateral line Limes ancestor – Eliza Catherine “Kate” Marchant Gaskill.  I included as much information that I could compile about the July 10, 1865 Greenfield Liquor Raid and the subsequent 1867 trial those determined ladies of Greenfield faced because of their actions.  

These crusading women were ‘warriors’ for eradicating the evils of liquor in their village.  They had strong beliefs that were based on the tragedies that resulted in so much misery stemming from drunkenness; and they wanted to do something to stop it.  I can’t blame them.  For them it had to be akin to the opiate crisis we are experiencing today – overwhelming.  They didn’t want to sit on the sidelines and do nothing.  

 

Prohibition was later repealed as we know, but these ladies will be remembered as women who took a stand boldly for a cause they believed in and were proud of it throughout their whole lives.

 

ELIZA CATHERINE LIMES MARCHANT GASKILL STORY

Cincinnati Daily Gazette

Thursday, January 24, 1867 – Page 1:1 – Volume 78

“FEMALE SUASION WITH THE LIQUOR DEALERS.

The Greenfield Ladies on Trial.

Their Know Nothing Meeting – Female Efforts to Keep a Secret – Testimony of the Ladies”

 Correspondence of the Cincinnati Gazette.

 Hillsboro, O. January 22.

“Did you see any hatchets there?”

“I did see two. Miss Julia Lake had one, and Miss Limes one.  I asked what they were for.  The ladies about me did not know.  I asked Miss Limes.  She said that the ladies who invited her to come, asked her to bring a hatchet; she supposed the liquor was to be spilled, after it was given up.  I remarked ironically, yes.  I suppose after it is rolled out it will be spilled.  I joined the procession as everybody else did; there was no change in dress, didn’t see any ladies wearing pages to their dresses. “

Sharing a Post from the NCPTT (National Center for Preservation Technology and Training) on the Subject of “Abrasive Cleaning of Grave Markers”

Sharing this blog post by the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training just posted today entitled: “Abrasive Cleaning of Grave Markers”

This article can also be accessed from the home page of the National Park Service.

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Thanking Dr. Mary Striegel for answering my question in the post concerning the use of abrasive tools on gravestones such as “Nyalox Brushes”* that rotate on power drills used to clean and ‘polish’ the surface of a gravestone for inscription reading purposes, etc.; and often promoted for use in the name of restoring a gravestone to its original state.

No one is saying that these types of brushes do not have their proper place for an appropriate and effective use. In my opinion, a gravestone is not one of them. As this article points out, if you would not use this type of a power tool to clean “the surface of your automobile” ….”then you would not use it to clean a grave marker.”

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I encourage anyone who has questions regarding using any power tool on a gravestone to please devote a few moments to read this story, and consider that it is worth it to you and the gravestone to make the choice to use the least aggressive methods first — methods that are non-invasive, non-toxic, and almost free!

For reading faint inscriptions on gravestones, try using mirrors ** to reflect sunlight on the names and dates.

If you feel you must clean, use plain water; it is recommended to use distilled water***.

Please review all of your options before taking even a scraper, or a brush, to a gravestone. Or, applying a chemical. Try the least abrasive and invasive techniques such as those mentioned above first. It will benefit both you and the gravestone with this approach!

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Sources:

*”Surface Finishing.com”

**”Arizona Pioneer & Cemetery Research Project”

***”Saveagrave.net”

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Suggested Reading:

“A Graveyard Preservation Primer” by Lynette Strangstad

Unraveling the Mystery of Finding an 1860’s White Marble Gravestone at an Antique Store in Wellington, Ohio

Unraveling the Mystery of Finding an 1860's White Marble Gravestone at an Antique Store in Wellington, Ohio

I have been told that this double marker for George D. and Lucy L. Stedman was rescued from a storefront building in downtown Wellington, Ohio. It is not known where it was before that.

This stone is currently at Addie’s Antiques at 135 East Herrick Avenue, in Wellington. Phone # 440-647-0990. The contact person for this stone is Mr. Doug Dunham who works most Sundays at Addie’s Antiques. He is selling this stone for $250.00. The children and their family are buried at the Spencer Cemetery in Spencer, Medina County, Ohio.

When I first saw this beautiful old gravemarker a week ago I did not see any pricetag on it. I was hopeful that perhaps it was waiting for pick up by a Stedman family descendant. But, that is not the case apparently. I learned today that the stone is indeed for sale. It would require a great deal of skillful work to remove the cement, brick etc. from the stone without destroying it. I am hoping it goes to a good home regardless.

The children are buried at the Spencer Cemetery in Medina County where there is a large four-sided monument erected for the family. The children’s names are inscribed on one of the sides. Memorials for them are posted on Find A Grave.

I am not aware if there are any laws that prevent people from selling old gravestones in Ohio, espeically in cases such as this where there is another marker in place at the gravesites.

I spoke to Doug Dunham this afternoon who works at Addie’s Antiques on Sundays, and he said that the people he got the stone from said they were going to throw it out if they could not dispose of it any other way.

I truly hope this precious original white marble double table grave marker for George D. and Lucy L. Stedman goes to a good home; preferably to a descendant or to a historical society that would accept it and properly take care of it.