Let’s keep the word “health” in Pre-Existing HEALTH Conditions!

Let’s think about Pre-existing HEALTH conditions!  Have you noticed lately many in the media and TV say or write:  “pre-existing conditions”?  I guess it is supposed to be silently understood that the word  “health” is implied in that statement; making it less important to actually keep the word “health” whenever references are made to this subject.  Let’s not leave it to individual interpretation if it is there or not; or if it is important to state it or not.

Like after the PPACA – Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act — started to be more commonly known as the “ACA” — to shorten it and make it easier to remember I suppose, and done so in an effort to counter the fact that Republicans quite sarcastically called this 2010 law “Obamacare” — naming it after President Obama but with a negative stance; (which reminds me of a retina specialist I saw back in 2010 when I told him I had no health care insurance, and that I was waiting on the Ohio High Risk Pool to kick in for me to apply a few months later.  At the time, the high risk pools were called “the bridge to 2014” when the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act plans in the Marketplace Exchanges would be available for everyone (not only children); and the retina specialist said with a smirk “oh you mean Obamacare?” and the tone of his voice told me he thought it was laughable;  and I just answered him “yes”.)

In reality “Obamacare” does not exist as it is not the official name of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.  I feel the words “Patient Protection” are also quite important to keep and repeat because we seem to have lost sight of their being a huge part of the reason the law was enacted.  Protections that include from being denied health insurance altogether due to having pre-existing HEALTH conditions.

No one in Congress, nor the President or anyone in his administration, nor anyone sitting on the Supreme Court bench; nor their families, are having to go without health insurance due to having pre-existing health conditions.  So, it is not fair or just that any American citizen should have to be without health insurance due to having pre-existing health conditions in our  21st Century America.  I have the rejection letters from 2010 from four different health insurance companies to prove that it did happen before the Patient Protection and Affordable Care became law.

Furthermore, a person didn’t need to have a major life-threatening illness to be rejected for health insurance coverage either.  So, why are we shortening “pre-existing health conditions” to only “pre-existing conditions”?  Is it like we shortened the PPACA to ACA to make it easier to remember?  Or perhaps to take the main focus off of the meaning of the word “health“?  Only saying or writing “Pre-Existing Conditions”, unintentionally or otherwise, leaves out the important word “HEALTH“!

Health conditions that exist when a person tries to enroll in health insurance plans are what these insurance companies haven’t forgotten about, and certainly won’t if they are once again allowed to reject people for obtaining any health insurance coverage or charge them ridiculously high monthly premiums in order to cover those pre-existing health conditions.  The answers to the questions on the insurer’s enrollment forms are meant to reveal a full range of health conditions and they do.  The health insurance companies take note of them, tally them up, and deem the potential enrollee either acceptable for enrollment; or brand the person as being uninsurable and the rejection letter is generated and sent out.  If a potential enrollee tries to conceal having pre-existing health conditions on their enrollment form, they will be found out and prosecuted for committing fraud.  Disclosure is on the last page of the normally 8 to 12 page enrollment form before the potential enrollee’s signature line.

We are not “making America great again” whatsoever by allowing health insurance companies to go back to the days when having pre-existing health conditions were used as a reason to reject potential enrollees from access to having health insurance and branded them being “uninsurable”.   Now, isn’t that an undeniably deplorable practice on the part of health insurance companies?

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Old Burying Ground in Greenfield volunteer work session coming up! – Reminder: Wednesday, October 3, 2018 – beginning at 8:30a.m.

If you missed joining the volunteers at the Old Burying Ground for the work session of September 30, 2018, this is a reminder that another one is scheduled for Wednesday, October 3rd starting at 8:30a.m.
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Always check the calendar on the Greenfield Historical Society’s website for upcoming events which include the “OBG” – Old Burying Ground work sessions!

To keep up to date with the latest progress made by the all-volunteer group who has been working for five years to restore the Old Burying Ground in Greenfield just click on the Past Events Section on the “A Look Back” tab found on the Greenfield Historical Society’s website.  

Next, take note of the “Tombstone Repair” and the dates of each of their work sessions thus far.  

Click on each of them to see the photographs and a recap of the type of work conducted during each of the work sessions.  

The Greenfield Historical Society volunteers are a well organized group of caring people who are well trained with cleaning, repairing, and resetting grave markers from the smallest to the largest; including the more difficult ones like the “Box Tombs” shown below.  

Spotlighting the Brecksville Cemetery in Brecksville, Cuyahoga County, Ohio

Below are some photographs taken during the September 23, 2018 tour of the Brecksville Cemetery 

The tour was almost two hours and it was quite well presented with the theme of “Headstones, Heroes, History, and Horticulture” — so the attendees, who also received a brochure about the cemetery, were treated to a guided study of these elements of this historic Northeast Ohio cemetery.  

WEAPING LADY ON TABLET MARKER BLACK AND WHITE GRAPHIC FOR USE IN CEMETERY BLOG

Click Here for the Brecksville Cemetery Tour Booklet posted online by the Brecksville Historical Association. 

Spotlighting the Box Tombs of the Old Burying Ground, Greenfield, Ohio

Congratulations to Scott Andersen who has done a fantastic job of restoring these box tombs seen in this photograph.  The one on the left with its sides of individual stones is the more intricate of the two.

As we can also see, the dirt area around these box tombs has been tamped down to make it ready for grass to be planted.

We know that tombstones and monuments need grass around them to add ground support so they do not start to lean.  Without grass they can eventually topple over.

One of the big mistakes cemetery groundskeepers make is to over-weedwhack around a gravestone, leaving a large circle of just dirt around it.

As we can see from the markers sitting in slotted bases and some installed directly into the ground, the grass around them not only looks good, but is helping to keep them upright.

Restoration work at The Old Burying Ground is now in its fifth year!  Almost monthly during the Spring and Summer months organized day-long work sessions are held to revitalize this early Ohio cemetery.  Improvements come one grave marker at a time as the dedicated volunteers work carefully row by row.  The transformation has been phenomenal!  Indeed the volunteers of the Greenfield Historical Society, and others who have so kindly volunteered with them, have much to be proud of!

The results of their work now sit impressively right in front of their eyes.  It is a treat to visit the  “OBG” – and to view the photographs showing all of their progress!

The Greenfield Historical Society

Old Burying Ground Project Summary

A Look Back at Past Events – Tombstone Repair

Poor maintenance practices plague Lorain’s Elmwood Cemetery – Lorain, Ohio

Below is the related Lorain “MorningJournal” News Story;

“Lorain cemetery grounds-keeping raises concerns”

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These photographs below were taken on August 12, 2018 at Elmwood Cemetery in Lorain.  They illustrate maintenance practices that are causing clumps of thick dead grass to stick to the stones and dry in the hot sun; making it difficult to remove the clumps from the stone.  

I think most folks would consider this an unsightly mess and disrespectful to the deceased.  This situation means that family members must clean off the dried up clumps from their family’s markers and monuments.  What about the markers and monuments where there is no family to handle this situation?  Will the cemetery groundskeepers come back to remove the thick clumps from the surface?  We just don’t know at this point.  

Sadly, this is the worst Elmwood Cemetery has looked since I have been visiting it for over 20 years.  

 

 

 

 

This last photo above illustrates where part of the problem lies.

Taking too long between trimmings.  

Allowing gravemarkers

to become too overgrown means taking too aggressive

of an approach to remove the grass/weeds around them. 

As we can easily see here; it has been awhile since there has been any trimming around this flat marker.  

Thankfully, there is no dead grass/weeds covering it; but live grass/weeds are covering over and around it to the point eventually it may no longer be seen. 

Monument honors 9 from Hardin County killed in World War II battle

KENTON — The farm boys from the heartland — all young enlisted soldiers from the same rural county in northwestern Ohio — found themselves surrounded by enemy snipers deep in the jungle of a little-known battle in the middle of a war. The fight for a Japanese-controlled airstrip in the Solomon Islands of the Pacific Ocean 75 years ago left the Ohio Army National Guard soldiers of the 148th Infantry Regiment’s Company E trapped under fire and out of ammunition, with no water

Source: Monument honors 9 from Hardin County killed in World War II battle