“Oh Tell Me of an Unclouded Day”

Oh, they tell me of a home far beyond the skies,

Oh, they tell me of a home far away;

Oh, they tell me of a home where no storm clouds rise,

Oh, they tell me of an unclouded day.

Refrain:

Oh, the land of cloudless day,

Oh, the land of an unclouded sky,

Oh, they tell me of a home where no storm clouds rise,

Oh, they tell me of an unclouded day.

Oh, they tell me of a home where my friends have gone,

Oh, they tell me of that land far away,

Where the tree of life in eternal bloom

Sheds its fragrance through the unclouded day.

Oh, they tell me of a King in His beauty there,

And they tell me that mine eyes shall behold

Where He sits on the throne that is whiter than snow,

In the city that is made of gold.

Oh, they tell me that He smiles on His children there,

And His smile drives their sorrows all away;

And they tell me that no tears ever come again

In that lovely land of unclouded day.

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Spotlighting my grandfather, Winfield Scott Limes, and other Limes ancestors who made the news in the “Columbus Dispatch” in the 20th Century

My paternal grandfather, Winfield Scott Limes, has been among my most fascinating and personally rewarding ancestors to research.  I remember seeing him as a young child since he died when I was age eleven.  I remember sitting across from him at our dining room table on Sundays when he came over for a big Sunday dinner that my mother would make.  

He has been featured here in several posts, but not with exactly the same focus about his life. That’s because I just recently discovered a 1906 article in the “Columbus Dispatch” that my grandfather had submitted and they saw fit to publish.  My grandfather, “Scott”, had lived in Columbus a number of years when around 1905 he and his wife, Essie Lillian (Lombard) Limes, and 4 sons — Ernest, Albert, Tom, and Harry — all moved to Lorain (as it turned out it was a temporary move.  The family returned to Columbus around 1907.  Then later in the 1920s, my grandparents, my father Harry, and later Albert, all moved back to Lorain County and made it their permanent residence.)

Scott Limes was not only a member of the International Wood Wire & Metal Lathers’ Union, Local #1 in Columbus, Ohio, but he was one of the founders of the union itself in 1899. During his time in Lorain he changed his union membership affiliation to Local #171.

wood wire & metal lath pin 1899

In the November 26, 1906, with “Higher Wages Attract”, we find “Scott” Limes writing about the encouraging building prospects he saw in the city of Lorain.  As it turned out for him, those prospects rippled out to the wider area including Sandusky.  That is because he and his two brothers (John Warren and Thomas Limes) did lathing work on the grand original Breakers Hotel at Cedar Point that when completed was placed on the National Register of Historic Places — that was until sadly it lost that status years later due to modern upgrades made to the buildings. 

Scott also felt it important for the “Columbus Dispatch
to include how excited he was that Local #171 in Lorain County won a baseball championship in that city in 1906. He was a part of that team playing as a young 21-year-old.  I had known he played baseball with the team because of the two photographs I had inherited of him wearing his Local #171 baseball uniform.  This published article tells me that my two photographs could have been from 1906.  How unexpectedly excited it was for me learn the year he probably wore the baseball uniform in those photographs.  I was able to have one colorized, which I feel brings him back to life for me; sort to speak, because it is such a life-like version.

As I continued with my research of the “Columbus Dispatch” I found additional stories or ‘tidbits’ with references to other Limes family members including the first marriage of my uncle Albert Limes.

Below are some of the stories I found that help round out the lives of some of my Limes relatives and ancestors who lived in Columbus, Ohio.

scott limes collage of 1906 columbus dispatch story and lather baseball photos - 3

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The Old Burying Ground in Greenfield, Ohio

Congratulations to Scott Andersen who has done a fantastic job of restoring these box tombs seen in this photograph.  The one on the left with its sides of individual stones is the more intricate of the two.  

As we can also see, the dirt area around these box tombs has been tamped down to make it ready for grass to be planted.

We know that tombstones and monuments need grass around them to add ground support so they do not start to lean.  Without grass they can eventually topple over.

One of the big mistakes cemetery groundskeepers make is to over-weedwhack around a gravestone, leaving a large circle of just dirt around it.  

As we can see from the markers sitting in slotted bases and some installed directly into the ground, the grass around them not only looks good, but is helping to keep them upright.  

Restoration work at The Old Burying Ground is now in its fifth year!  Almost monthly during the Spring and Summer months organized day-long work sessions are held to revitalize this early Ohio cemetery.  Improvements come one grave marker at a time as the dedicated volunteers work carefully row by row.  The transformation has been phenomenal!

Indeed the volunteers of the Greenfield Historical Society, and others who have so kindly volunteered with them, have much to be proud of!

The results of their work now sit impressively right in front of their eyes.  It is a treat to visit the  “OBG” – and to view the photographs showing all of their progress!

The Greenfield Historical Society

Old Burying Ground Project Summary

A Look Back at Past Events – Tombstone Repair

Main Street Antiques of Oberlin, Ohio has Lorain artifacts for sale

Main Street Antiques in Oberlin Ohio has these wonderful Lorain Ohio artifacts for sale.   The wedding photos are thought to be of members of the Ricci Family that are connected to the Ricci Tailors that once were operating on Broadway in Lorain.  And the Lorain Tornado of 1924 full page print of the devasting scenes of the aftermath 

The Bombing of St. Ives Cornwall and the Strafing of it’s Beaches by the Luftwaffe August 1942 .

djwilson22

bomb damage

Owing to censorship in WW11 , many details were left out of newspaper reports of enemy action over the British Isles .

The full report below in The Cornishman 3rd September 1942 only gave scant details of locations and buildings damaged in the raid by two German fighters . St. Ives was just loosely referred to as a “South-West town” .

It was only by checking the names of the injured and the one lady killed and then locating them on the previous 1939 Register , that I was able to pin-point the report to be the of St.Ives .

The attack appears to have started with strafing of Porthminster Beach by machine gun fire . The pilots must have known that being the end of August there would be many children  and holidaymakers on the beach but nevertheless went ahead with their attack . Miraculously it appears no-one was…

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