Floral Hills Memory Gardens at both the Ross County and Pickaway County locations are heading toward a resolution of their long-standing problems

Sharing two newspaper reports about two Ohio cemeteries – with the same name – one in Ross County and the other one in Pickaway County.  

They are Floral Hills Memory Gardens.  News about their situations has been shared in several posts on this blog. 

First, thanking Sheridan Hendrix for researching and writing this news story primarily regarding the Floral Hills Memory Gardens location in Ross County that was published in the “Columbus Dispatch” on October 3, 2019. :

“Despite Law Change, Ohio’s abandoned cemeteries still in limbo” 

Abandoned, yet active, cemeteries are an increasing reality in Ohio. 

Because of this fact, a broader outreach to educate the general public about them is important.

This feature article also cites and has links to stories that have been published about Fairview Memorial Park in Delaware County, and Grandview Memorial Park in Portage County — both cemeteries were victims of criminal activity committed by their owners who are currently in prison. 

A sobering focus details the ongoing maintenance issues for those left behind  through no fault of their own.   

It has been six years since Dave Robertson began tending to the 37-acre lawn of Floral Hills Memory Gardens near Chillicothe.”

I’d rather we don’t ever need to write and read stories like this one, but since they are a reality, bringing increased awareness about them IS needed. 

This is a sobering story indeed.  So sad because it should not have to be that in the 21st Century, and in Ohio, we have abandoned and orphaned, active cemeteries that have also lost their registration with the state.  

Those with complaints about such cemeteries must proceed through the steps of first submitting them to the Ohio Cemetery Dispute Resolution Commission (“OCDRC”)  The OCDRC will investigate the complaint and act upon it accordingly.Because of the passage of HB 168 in 2018, the OCDRC can refer the case to a local Court of Common Pleas. Next, will be the appointment of a suitable Receiver who will have the duty of handling the operations of the cemetery, which includes re-registering it with the Department of Real Estate; until a permanent owner can be found.

 

Meanwhile, the adversely affected cemetery sits with no legal owner to care for it in all of the ways a cemetery deserves to be maintained. 

 

 Hopefully, the Floral Hills Memory Gardens in Ross County gets the much-needed and long-awaited help in the form of a Receiver and finding a suitable and permanent owner for it.   

“Clean Up Floral Hills” – on Facebook Ross County Location. 

  

Now, we turn our attention to this notice published in the “Circleville Herald”:

“Notice:”

Publish Date:

Friday, September 27, 2019

Notice Content

NOTICE OF COMPLAINT FOR FORECLOSURE OF REAL ESTATE TAX LIEN 

“Notice is hereby given that an action against Ronald L. Downey and Joseph L. Miller, in the Court of Common Pleas, Pickaway County, OH, 207 S. Court Street, Circleville, OH 43113, was filed on 3/14/19 styled Ellery Elick, Treasurer, Pickaway County, Ohio, Plaintiff v. Ronald L. Downey, et al, Defendants, Case No. 2019DLT003. 

The Complaint is to foreclose the lien of real estate taxes due and payable on the real property known as Floral Hills Cemetery, US 23 and Little Walnut Road, Circleville, OH 43113, PPN M30-0-004-00-037-00, M30-0-004-00-033-02, M30-0-004-00-048-00, M30-0-004-00-038-00 and M30-0-004-00-039-00, last transfer OR Vol. 615, Pg. 2642; OR Vol. 646, Pg. 2365. Legal description can be viewed on the Pickaway County Recorders website at countyfusion2.kofiletech.us. The prayer in the complaint is: 1. The Treasurer be found to have a good and valid lien on the within described real property, in the sums of $55,246.63, 11,974.61, 8,648.27, 8,648.27 and 976.67, respectively, plus accrued taxes, assessments, penalties, interest and costs. 2. That all defendants be required to set up their claims or be forever barred. 3. That unless the amount found to be due to this plaintiff be paid within a reasonable time as established by this Court, the equity of redemption be foreclosed and an order of sale issue to the Sheriff of Pickaway County, Ohio directing him to sell the real property which is the subject of this action as provided in 5721.19 ORC. 4. Such other and further relief in law and in equity as proper. All defendants are required to answer the complaint within 28 days after the last publication of this notice which will be published once each week for six successive weeks. The last publication will be made on 11/01/19 and the 28 days for answer will commence on that date. if defendant fails to answer or otherwise respond as required, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Jeffrey A. Catri Asst. Prosecuting Attorney Pickaway County, Ohio 203 South Scioto Street, P.O. Box 910 Circleville, Ohio 43113 (740) 474-6066 Phone JAMES W. DEAN, CLERK OF COURTS 207 SOUTH COURT STREET CIRCLEVILLE, OHIO 43113 (740) 474-5231 September 27, 2019 October 4, 11, 18, 25, 2019 Nov 1, 2019 Circleville Herald – 561581″

At this time, it is unknown if there is a precedent in Ohio where an active, yet abandoned, cemetery went into foreclosure and was sold at a Sheriff’s sale. 

 

Questions remain.:

It is unclear what the reasons are that the Pickaway County Floral Hills Memory Gardens apparently would not also have a Receiver assigned to it rather than the cemetery be offered in a Sheriff’s sale?

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Or, why hasn’t the municipality where the cemetery is located accept responsibility for its ownership during the past decade?  Would it finally agree to accept it if the cemetery fails to get a new owner through the Sheriff’s sale?

Sharing side-by-side before repairs and after repairs photos of the Henry Wilson Irwin Family markers at the Old Burying Ground in Greenfield, Ohio courtesy of Scott Andersen

It is my pleasure to share these side-by-side photographs taken by Scott Andersen on August 22, 2019 of the row of Henry Wilson Irwin family grave markers at the Old Burying Ground in Greenfield, Highland County, Ohio.  

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Another step in this process remains to be completed for these grave markers.  That is cleaning them with D/2 Biological Solution.

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All of this restoration progress for these nine grave markers was made possible through the efforts of Greenfield Historical Society volunteers, Scott Andersen, John King, and Michael Lee Anderson who largely handle the repairs and re-settings of grave markers; as well as the heavy lifting for the larger monuments at the Old Burying Ground. 

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One of Greenfield’s most notable native sons and decorated Naval hero was Rear Admiral Noble Edward Irwin.  

His parents were Henry Wilson Irwin and his fourth wife, Lavinia Ann “Lavina” Rogers Irwin.  

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Rear Admiral Irwin graduated from the United States Naval Academy in June 1891. He was wounded in action on May 1, 1898 while aboard the USS Baltimore at the Battle of Manila Bay. Admiral Irwin was awarded the Navy Cross for meritorious service as director of Naval Aviation during WWI.
The U.S. Destroyer, the USS Irwin, was named in his honor.”

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Remembering the Bowditch Boathouse at the end of Arizona Avenue, on Lorain’s East Side.

On March 27, 2015, I wrote a blog post here entitled.:

“Remembering My Parents and Our Home at 208 Arizona Avenue, on Lorain’s East Side”

Sharing my latest photograph I recently received, unexpectedly no less, that has brought a floodgate of memories back to me of my early childhood days and put them in a much clearer focus than I have had for a long time.  It is a rather simple looking image, but one that  has made a huge impact upon me unlike any other. 

It is a 1951-1952 era black and white photo that Mr. Bob Bowditch shared of his family’s one time boathouse that sat at the end of a sloping hill that led to the end of the street that I lived on, Arizona Avenue, on Lorain’s East Side.   I remember so well walking down that slope.  I recall how I grasped onto the trees as I trekked down to get to the boathouse and boat dock area when I knew my father would be after coming back home from a morning of fishing; or to visit him when he had gone down there to get his 14 foot Lyman outboard ready for either the beginning of a fishing season or at the end of it.  I also fondly remember buying grapette pop in glass bottles there when I had some money with me – which wasn’t much of course.  If my memory serves me correctly, the pop was taken out of a cold chest type cooler.  

I look at every detail of that little building now and examine what surrounds it.  Off in the distance to the right, was the fencing that separated the boathouse property from the American Ship Building Company that loomed quite largely over the area with large buildings, dry docks, and freighters.   However, what I remember the most is the sloping hill that was my pathway to the boathouse that sat at the edge of the Black River in Lorain. 

Oh, how I wish my father, Harry Limes, were here right now to view the image with me.  What memories we could talk about.  And, what stories I know he could tell me about his time docking his small wooden boat there.  That boat dock was a chief reason my parents bought our house at 208 Arizona Avenue when it came up for sale in the summer of 1948 when I was six months old.  My father caught more fish than I think I or anyone could have counted during his lifetime.  Those fish dinners my mother prepared weekly for ourselves, and sometimes for guests, would be too numerous to recount as well. 

Our street was a street of dreams for both my parents and myself.  Seeing this image of the boathouse lets me once again walk down the Arizona Avenue I knew growing up and grab onto those trees trunks to steady myself to safely descend down the slope that was my quiet path.  

Sadly Arizona Avenue has changed drastically since the 1950s.  My childhood home was demolished by 2003.  All of the houses were torn down as well.  The land sat empty until this past year when storage units were built on the west side behind the gas station.  I can’t go back to my childhood or the scenes that were there from it, but I can remember what was once there and share my recollections here.  

Spotlighting Brian Keenan – Composer and Pianist. Well known performer of Comtemporary and Early Ragtime; and American Standards music concerts.

Spotlighting Brian Keenan – a talented composer of original music, including Contemporary Ragtime. 

In addition, Brian is a well-known concert performer of American Standards music.  His concerts are unique because Brian has extensive knowledge of the music he performs and the lives of their composers.

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Here is a link to Brian Keenan’s “YouTube” Channel.:
Brian Keenan

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Hidden Falls” – is one of my favorite compositions by Brian Keenan. It is also the title of one of his best known CDs.

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Kentucky Blue” – Brian Keenan performs his original composition. 

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Brian Keenan is a regular performer at the

Ragtime in Randall concerts in Randall, Iowa. 

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HB168 – Ohio Cemetery Grant Program – Recipients Listing Released

September 9, 2019: 

From the Ohio Department of Commerce

 Division of Real Estate and Professional Licensing:
“The Division received 143 on-time cemetery grant applications! 

What a tremendous response to the first year of this grant program.” 

October 9, 2019:

Sharing a Ohio Department of Commerce 

“News Release”

HB168 Ohio Cemetery Grant Program 

Listing of Recipients for 2020

If you have any questions or require additional assistance, 

please contact the Division at: 

614-466-5384 or 

CemeteryGrants@com.state.oh.us. 

Complete information and forms can be found at www.com.ohio.gov/real.

From the office of Rep. Dick Stein – House Bill 168 Sponsor:

“Each year/ grant cycle, $100k will be transferred from the Division of Cemeteries burial permit fund to the Cemetery Grant Fund. Annual issuance of burial permits exceeds the grant fund amount to ensure its future availability. There is an existing statute that caps distribution of many state grants to 80% of the total fund–this is to account for administering funds and financial market fluctuations. It is possible for leftover monies to carryover to the next grant cycle. We are very happy to see so much interest and hope those projects not funded this round have a future opportunity.”

Please keep in mind that inactive cemeteries with no burials during the prior 25 calendar years, family burial cemeteries, and for-profit cemeteries are not eligible to receive a grant under this program. 

Ohio Administrative Code – 1301:13-7 Eligibility for Grants

Link to Cemetery Grant Forms

Scroll down to find the

 Cemetery Grant Application Instructions

and

The Cemetery Grant Application

Sharing Susan Hoffman Matthews’ website with photograph collections

Sharing Susan Hoffman Matthews genealogical website

Under the tab “Photographs Collections” – Susan has so kindly shared her photographs she took on Saturday, September 21, 2019 in Upper Sandusky, Wyandot County, Ohio, when the deed was transferred from the United Methodists to the Wyandotte Nation Oklahoma for the Methodist Mission Church and the Old Mission Cemetery.  

FROM SUSAN HOFFMAN MATTHEWS - SEPTEMBER 21 2019 - UPPER SANDUSKY OHIO DEED TRANSFER.jpg

Remembering Linda Kennelley Kurianowicz — Graduate of Lorain High School 1966

1966 graduation photo

 of Linda L. Kennelley Kurianowicz

Lorain High School

Lorain, Ohio

 

I first became acquainted with Linda Kennelley while attending  Longfellow Junior High School in Lorain, Ohio from 1960 to 1962.  

Afterward, we both attended Lorain High School; graduating in 1966.  

I lived on Arizona Avenue and Linda lived on New Jersey Avenue.

We were East Siders – residing East of the Charles Berry Bascule Bridge that spanned what was then Routes 6&2. We knew it better as East Erie Avenue.

Because Lorain’s downtown district is on Broadway just west of the bascule bridge, the East Side was the quiet side of town that didn’t have many businesses. 

Linda and I were both shy girls that soon learned we enjoyed each other’s company.

And, of course, we shared the same given name!  

There were a lot of “Lindas” in our classes down through the school years. It was a popular name for many of us who were born in the late 1940s.  My mother told me I was named after Linda Darnell who was a rising movie star at that time. 

 

During our last year at Lorain High School, Linda and I exchanged our senior pictures with each other. We wrote down our thoughts and good wishes for the future on the photo’s reverse side.  

I still have Linda’s wallet-size photo she gave me.  

Linda wrote:  

“To a real good friend that I hope our friendship will last.  Your friend Linda.” 

After we graduated from high school, Linda Kennelley and I did move on going in different directions. 

Linda married a fellow L.H.S. classmate; Roger Kurianowicz. He passed away in 1987 and was buried at Resthaven Memory Gardens in Avon.   

Linda’s parents were Charles C. Kennelley and Eileen Kennelley.

Sadly, in March of 2019, I read that Linda had passed away.  I was so shocked and just could not believe the grim news.

I went to the Dovin Funeral Home on Elyria Avenue in Lorain for Linda’s visitation.  I saw Linda’s two daughters and met and spoke to one.  I gave her my condolence card and my gift. 

When I walked up to Linda to pay my last respects to her and give her my goodbye with my prayers for her, I felt her presence around me.  The Linda I knew left behind a lot of people who loved her. They will carry their memories of her with them throughout their lifetime.  

I know I will too.

  

Linda, I know we will meet again.

Perhaps we’ll take a nice long walk together on East Erie Avenue one more time.      

Linda Kennelley Kurianowicz’s Find A Grave memorial

(Above photos by Linda Jean Limes Ellis)

The walkway leading up to the

 Garden of Wisdom Section

where Linda Kennelley Kurianowicz

and her husband, Roger, are buried.

Sharing an earlier photograph of Linda L. Kennelley