Spotlighting the Box Tombs of the Old Burying Ground, Greenfield, Ohio

Congratulations to Scott Andersen who has done a fantastic job of restoring these box tombs seen in this photograph.  The one on the left with its sides of individual stones is the more intricate of the two.

As we can also see, the dirt area around these box tombs has been tamped down to make it ready for grass to be planted.

We know that tombstones and monuments need grass around them to add ground support so they do not start to lean.  Without grass they can eventually topple over.

One of the big mistakes cemetery groundskeepers make is to over-weedwhack around a gravestone, leaving a large circle of just dirt around it.

As we can see from the markers sitting in slotted bases and some installed directly into the ground, the grass around them not only looks good, but is helping to keep them upright.

Restoration work at The Old Burying Ground is now in its fifth year!  Almost monthly during the Spring and Summer months organized day-long work sessions are held to revitalize this early Ohio cemetery.  Improvements come one grave marker at a time as the dedicated volunteers work carefully row by row.  The transformation has been phenomenal!  Indeed the volunteers of the Greenfield Historical Society, and others who have so kindly volunteered with them, have much to be proud of!

The results of their work now sit impressively right in front of their eyes.  It is a treat to visit the  “OBG” – and to view the photographs showing all of their progress!

The Greenfield Historical Society

Old Burying Ground Project Summary

A Look Back at Past Events – Tombstone Repair

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Poor maintenance practices plague Lorain’s Elmwood Cemetery – Lorain, Ohio

Below is the related Lorain “MorningJournal” News Story;

“Lorain cemetery grounds-keeping raises concerns”

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These photographs below were taken on August 12, 2018 at Elmwood Cemetery in Lorain.  They illustrate maintenance practices that are causing clumps of thick dead grass to stick to the stones and dry in the hot sun; making it difficult to remove the clumps from the stone.  

I think most folks would consider this an unsightly mess and disrespectful to the deceased.  This situation means that family members must clean off the dried up clumps from their family’s markers and monuments.  What about the markers and monuments where there is no family to handle this situation?  Will the cemetery groundskeepers come back to remove the thick clumps from the surface?  We just don’t know at this point.  

Sadly, this is the worst Elmwood Cemetery has looked since I have been visiting it for over 20 years.  

 

 

 

 

This last photo above illustrates where part of the problem lies.

Taking too long between trimmings.  

Allowing gravemarkers

to become too overgrown means taking too aggressive

of an approach to remove the grass/weeds around them. 

As we can easily see here; it has been awhile since there has been any trimming around this flat marker.  

Thankfully, there is no dead grass/weeds covering it; but live grass/weeds are covering over and around it to the point eventually it may no longer be seen. 

Monument honors 9 from Hardin County killed in World War II battle

KENTON — The farm boys from the heartland — all young enlisted soldiers from the same rural county in northwestern Ohio — found themselves surrounded by enemy snipers deep in the jungle of a little-known battle in the middle of a war. The fight for a Japanese-controlled airstrip in the Solomon Islands of the Pacific Ocean 75 years ago left the Ohio Army National Guard soldiers of the 148th Infantry Regiment’s Company E trapped under fire and out of ammunition, with no water

Source: Monument honors 9 from Hardin County killed in World War II battle

Ohio veteran finds wife’s grave in ‘unacceptable’ condition

Ossie Tacket is an 89-year-old military veteran battling prostate cancer.

Source: Ohio veteran finds wife’s grave in ‘unacceptable’ condition

An Excerpt from this story.:
“The Ohio Department of Commerce is in charge of overseeing the enforcement of the laws related to cemeteries and released this statement today:

The oversight of Ohio’s cemeteries is a responsibility we take seriously. The passage of House Bill 168 helps by giving the Division more authority to assist in cemetery complaints and ensuring that cemeteries are complying with Ohio Cemetery Law. Additionally, a grant program will be established through this passage, which will offset some of the maintenance and training costs associated with operating a cemetery. Our team is hard at work formulating the guidelines for the implementation of this new law, specifically the Cemetery Grant Program.

Like most bills, the new law goes into effect 90 days after the Governor signs it.

Unfortunately, the law will have no immediate impact for the Tacket’s current situation. However, it should make it so things like what happened to them do not happen to other families.”

Floral Hills has been in legal disputes for years, ever since the sale of the cemetery.

Tacket says, the original owners he purchased the plot, vault, headstone and plaque from were wonderful people who cared about the cemetery.

He says it has gone downhill since the sale.

A volunteer has been trying to maintain the cemetery as the legal disputes have not been settled.